AK rope drop with ECV

linznjody

New member
I’m planning a 40th birthday trip for 12 people, and I just found out the birthday guy’s mom is putting off a hip replacement to go and needs a scooter. We were already planning on getting to AK at 6 am for the 7 am open because I couldn’t get FOP passes.

I’ve done rope drop plenty of times, but I don’t remember ever seeing a scooter that early, or just didn’t notice them. Will that seriously affect us once we start the walk to the bridge? FOP is the ride birthday boy wants to do the most, and he’s determined to ride it then.

Any other suggestions on navigating the parks with an ECV? I’ve never planned for that before.
 
The ECV shouldn't be an issue to rope drop. They are very easy to drive and can travel faster than people, especially when no pedestrians are in the way. With pedestrians around, an ECV can keep up just fine. My husband uses one on our trips and often my son and I are trying to keep up with him. We did a trip with his 70yo+ mom in a scooter and it went very smoothly, even with 2 scooters and 2 walkers.

There isn't much difference to touring, most rides the ECV can be driven on line right up to the ride. The CM's put it in neutral and roll it over to the ride exit where it will be waiting for the passenger to return.

ECVs can easily board the buses and monorails, but parking lot trams cannot take them.
If your group is driving, 2 options:
Let the ECV drive to meet at park front (we like to meet inside the gate at the mapstand), or
Let the parking attendants know you have an ECV and they'll let you park in the medical overflow lot at park front (follow the blue line heading into park for this).
 

lovett1979

Member
Ditto to everything Heather said. I did a RD at AK to ride FoP and there was a family in front of me with a person in an ECV. Once they let us through the tapstiles. she raced in front of everyone to get to the holding area on the bridge, then the rest of her family was able to squeeze through the crowd to catch up. So it's actually an advantage to have someone do that!

Are planning on renting one from an outside dealer for the whole trip, or renting them daily from Disney? I'm not sure where AK's rental location is, but if it's inside the park, that might put a delay in your plans. But if you've got your own/renting for the trip, you should be fine.
 

linznjody

New member
Thanks! We’re renting an outside one for the entire trip. I wasn’t clear that my main concern was us getting separated because of the crowds, but it seems like it doesn’t matter and we can catch up if needed. I was already a little nervous about losing each other since we have so many, but thanks for making me feel better. The parking suggestion helps too - we can use the buses for every other time.
 
You're welcome :D

For shows, usually the ECV pulls into the seating area and uses the ECV as their seat. Mostly it's the back row (Indy, Fantasmic),and a few in the front (Fest of Lion King). There are regular seats around the ECV/wheelchair areas for the rest of the party to sit. You don't need to arrive extra early, just the normal 10-15 minutes (Fantasmic and RoL 20 minutes prior).

You party may need to split if there's not enough seats available around the ECV seating area, or if some of your party doesn't want to always be sitting in the back row.
 

lovett1979

Member
Regarding the buses, they usually will board only two ECV's per bus (though there is room for 3, I believe), so if you get to the bus stop and there are already 2 (or more) ECVs/wheelchairs waiting, you'll have to wait another round to get on. Just something to consider when you are figuring out timing/if driving is better. Also, if taking the bus, the ECV driver will have to "parallel park" without much wiggle-room. They might want to practice that a little.

If you do drive, and arrive at TTC in the morning, make sure you follow the blue line as soon as you get through the parking booths. THIS WILL NOT BE THE DIRECTION THE REGULAR PARKING ARROWS ARE POINTING. I totally missed this (because usually we just follow the regular parking signs till we find a person, and then they direct us) during my RD attempt a few weeks ago and we lost about 10 minutes circling back.

As Heather said, the ECV can go in most queues, though some of them will require her to transfer to a wheelchair (they will provide these at the attraction entrances). Also, make sure the ECV (or wheelchair) is at the front of your group going into and through the queues so the CMs will direct you to the necessary areas.
 
Top