Coronavirus

pixarprincess

Well-known member
Those databases might already exist on the state level. We have one of those win a million bucks by getting vaccinated contests. In the sign up process we had to agree to allow them to verify our vaccination status but it never asked where or by whom we received the vaccine.

Not sure how they would do that without some kind of database.
Our county and state in California both have systems in place. It is nice as we have or physical cards but also digital records of our status. I am glad to have it in my phone in a verifiable way and not have to carry that flimsy notecard everywhere.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
On a lighter note, I dropped by Dad's house while he is out of town. While going through the garage I noticed that he had a huge box Ivermectin, the horse paste that people are using to treat Covid. Of course, he has 5 horses and it was with a bunch of other veterinary medicine.
 

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
I know it *could* be done. We send out social security to people nationwide, after all. But there’s been no movement to collect this data nationally. NYS has the “Excelsior Pass” which adds a verified vaccination card to Apple Wallet. But it doesn’t work if you were vaccinated in a different state. I feel like the Biden administration made the decision that 10 months in was too late to start this kind of work and here we are in month 18 and it seems they’re still thinking it’s too late…
 

Anne

Well-known member

Anne - I would love to hear your thoughts on using two months of data for pediatric vaccines to get emergency use approval.


ETA: additional timeline estimates - https://www.reuters.com/business/he...-kids-age-5-11-could-come-october-2021-09-10/
September submission and October EUA would still be 6 months from the start of the phase 3 trials which was March. Phase 2 in kids started December 2020. It would be 2-3 months of data for the kids enrolled in the summer, after the FDA requested a larger cohort. I'm good with that time frame. The 6 months always seemed like a pretty random requirement. In the history of all vaccines we have never seen a post-vaccine side effect occur more than 2 months from the vaccine dose (despite whatever nonsense anti-vaxers will claim). The other interesting thing is that an epidemiologist I follow has said the extra number of kids enrolled in the trials in summer will not do anything to reveal rare side effects (which was the justification given by the FDA for adding them). Numbers would need to be in the range of a million doses given to see rare side effects that wouldn't be revealed by the initial study numbers. So it doesn't seem to me that we will get any significant additional information if they take longer than October to approve an EUA for 5-11.

I'm sure the reporters for the articles you linked all watched the NYT interview with Dr. Fauci yesterday. All along Pfizer has been saying they would still be ready end of Sept/beginning Oct to submit to FDA even with the additional kids enrolled. The snag was recently FDA saying that it would be a minimum of 60 days to review all the data (they weren't even talking about waiting for more data, just reviewing the data). There's been a lot of pressure on the FDA to step up that timeline, and yesterday Dr. Fauci was saying 2-3 weeks for the FDA to review after the Sept/Oct submission. It was interesting that the NYT reporters, after the interview, were quick to say Dr. Fauci was going with an optimistic timeline. So who knows, but the sooner the better from my perspective. I'd give it to my kids today if the correct dose was available and approved.
 

Anne

Well-known member
Those databases might already exist on the state level. We have one of those win a million bucks by getting vaccinated contests. In the sign up process we had to agree to allow them to verify our vaccination status but it never asked where or by whom we received the vaccine.

Not sure how they would do that without some kind of database.
Most, if not all, states have a vaccine database. Often states will have agreements to share data with geographically nearby states. For example from my electronic medical record platform in WI I don't automatically get Illinois data, but I can do an electronic "query" to the Illinois database to request the record for a specific patient. I'm not a computer person, but it seems like it wouldn't be too hard to have all the state databases report to some central federal database. Except then you'll probably have people raise HIPPA concerns if there is data sharing without explicit permission. In my case I have permission on a case by case basis from the patient/parent to access their record in another state.

The other snag is that not every COVID vaccine distribution site has reported their vaccine doses to the state database. In some cases the only record that a dose was given to a specific person is that easily forged paper card. Our clinics and hospital already have work flows in place to report to the registry and have continued this process for all COVID doses we have given. But a lot of the private pharmacies aren't set up to report to the database. Prior to the pandemic they were mostly just giving flu shots which weren't as important to get in the registry.
 

Anne

Well-known member
On a lighter note, I dropped by Dad's house while he is out of town. While going through the garage I noticed that he had a huge box Ivermectin, the horse paste that people are using to treat Covid. Of course, he has 5 horses and it was with a bunch of other veterinary medicine.
I hear the paste is pretty tasty...
 
September submission and October EUA would still be 6 months from the start of the phase 3 trials which was March. Phase 2 in kids started December 2020. It would be 2-3 months of data for the kids enrolled in the summer, after the FDA requested a larger cohort. I'm good with that time frame. The 6 months always seemed like a pretty random requirement. In the history of all vaccines we have never seen a post-vaccine side effect occur more than 2 months from the vaccine dose (despite whatever nonsense anti-vaxers will claim). The other interesting thing is that an epidemiologist I follow has said the extra number of kids enrolled in the trials in summer will not do anything to reveal rare side effects (which was the justification given by the FDA for adding them). Numbers would need to be in the range of a million doses given to see rare side effects that wouldn't be revealed by the initial study numbers. So it doesn't seem to me that we will get any significant additional information if they take longer than October to approve an EUA for 5-11.

I'm sure the reporters for the articles you linked all watched the NYT interview with Dr. Fauci yesterday. All along Pfizer has been saying they would still be ready end of Sept/beginning Oct to submit to FDA even with the additional kids enrolled. The snag was recently FDA saying that it would be a minimum of 60 days to review all the data (they weren't even talking about waiting for more data, just reviewing the data). There's been a lot of pressure on the FDA to step up that timeline, and yesterday Dr. Fauci was saying 2-3 weeks for the FDA to review after the Sept/Oct submission. It was interesting that the NYT reporters, after the interview, were quick to say Dr. Fauci was going with an optimistic timeline. So who knows, but the sooner the better from my perspective. I'd give it to my kids today if the correct dose was available and approved.

Thank you for the clarification and insight! We are so ready for our son to be vaccinated, too.
 

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
I can't bear to look at photos, watch video, or even read accounts of 9/11. So instead, I went back in this thread to September/October 2020. It's interesting to see how collectively we pretty accurately predicted the position we're in right now. Although a few members were choosing to be optimistic and have faith that our fellow Americans would act responsibly, most of the responses predicted the opposite behavior with countless unnecessary lives lost and prolonged pandemic.
 

i<3riviera

Member
So instead, I went back in this thread to September/October 2020. It's interesting to see how collectively we pretty accurately predicted the position we're in right now. Although a few members were choosing to be optimistic and have faith that our fellow Americans would act responsibly, most of the responses predicted the opposite behavior with countless unnecessary lives lost and prolonged pandemic.
I certainly thought you would all collectively act responsibly; but then everyone voted for Biden … supposedly

kidding!
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I certainly thought you would all collectively act responsibly; but then everyone voted for Biden … supposedly

kidding!
Your kidding but I have been thinking about this a lot. Here in America, the biggest problem we have had dealing with this pandemic is that our media sources are used to dealing with issues, not emergencies, in terms of D vs R. A hurricane, or a tornado, or a bomb, they know how to report on those collectively.

And it has worked, because in a few days something else comes along. And everyone can go back to their respective sideline. Covid and 2020 (and all that entails) exposed how damaging framing the world in that way has become. It has made us impotent.

More than one person on this thread has mentioned that they can't deal with the 9/11 retrospectives, and I 100% agree. The "Never forget" slogan is hard to hear because I ain't sure we learned the lesson in the first place.

Climate change, viral pandemics, economic inequality, racial injustice, etc. are not things that can be covered and dealt with in a 4 day news cycle. And our media, here in America because perhaps it is better elsewhere, hasn't figured out how to cover the long game.

I don't have a solution. But I really think it is a problem.
 
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Anne

Well-known member
Acting FDA commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock was quoted yesterday as saying that once the applications from the vaccine manufacturers are in hand the FDA will "be prepared to complete its review as quickly as possible, likely in the matter of weeks rather than months." On Friday Pfizer's chief medical officer said "we will be presenting the results from our study on 5-11 year-olds to authorities around the world in the coming weeks." So it looks like the FDA is prepared to move faster than they originally stated. Here's hoping we're looking at 4-6 weeks instead of 2-3 months for the 5-11 EUA.

My mother-in-law passed away yesterday (not COVID and not unexpected, she is 86 and was in decline for some time). It is really frustrating during the funeral planning process to discover that 2 of my husband's 4 siblings (and their spouses) are not vaccinated. That really limits my family's ability to patriciate. His siblings aren't militant anything. They've never been strongly political. They're afraid of the vaccine, they say because of their existing health conditions. The VERY reason they really need the vaccine. I don't understand how we've gotten to the point where pretty average people don't trust their doctors, government, or science, and are willing to entertain crazy unscientific misinformation. Social media has not done our society any favors. Without social media I wonder if any of this nonsense would have gotten the traction that it has. Although I keep being reminded of a Twilight Zone episode where aliens take over the Earth simply by pitting us against each other, saying something along the lines that they won't need any weapons to depopulate the planet, the humans will do it to themselves. So perhaps we'd have managed this debacle without social media.
 

smwisc

Active member
Acting FDA commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock was quoted yesterday as saying that once the applications from the vaccine manufacturers are in hand the FDA will "be prepared to complete its review as quickly as possible, likely in the matter of weeks rather than months." On Friday Pfizer's chief medical officer said "we will be presenting the results from our study on 5-11 year-olds to authorities around the world in the coming weeks." So it looks like the FDA is prepared to move faster than they originally stated. Here's hoping we're looking at 4-6 weeks instead of 2-3 months for the 5-11 EUA.

My mother-in-law passed away yesterday (not COVID and not unexpected, she is 86 and was in decline for some time). It is really frustrating during the funeral planning process to discover that 2 of my husband's 4 siblings (and their spouses) are not vaccinated. That really limits my family's ability to patriciate. His siblings aren't militant anything. They've never been strongly political. They're afraid of the vaccine, they say because of their existing health conditions. The VERY reason they really need the vaccine. I don't understand how we've gotten to the point where pretty average people don't trust their doctors, government, or science, and are willing to entertain crazy unscientific misinformation. Social media has not done our society any favors. Without social media I wonder if any of this nonsense would have gotten the traction that it has. Although I keep being reminded of a Twilight Zone episode where aliens take over the Earth simply by pitting us against each other, saying something along the lines that they won't need any weapons to depopulate the planet, the humans will do it to themselves. So perhaps we'd have managed this debacle without social media.
Good news on the vaccine! Bad news on unvaccinated in-laws. I just found out today that my SIL was just released from the hospital with COVID double pneumonia - unvaccinated. History of asthma and other respiratory problems. And she's a CNA in a correctional infirmary! She's damn lucky she's not dead.
 

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
I don't understand how we've gotten to the point where pretty average people don't trust their doctors, government, or science, and are willing to entertain crazy unscientific misinformation.

Sowing distrust of institutions (education, media, science, etc.) has been a key part of the conservative movement since before Barry Goldwater.



 

Strangeite

Well-known member
My daughter just received her yearbook for her Freshman year. Looking through it, she keeps saying "I didn't know they looked like that" or similar. It just hit me that its because everyone has been masked since she started high school.
 

Nia

Well-known member
UK finally changing the recommendations - kids over 12 can get vaccinated. My son had his second dose this weekend, few hours of fever next day but feeling good today

Strange time we live in Strangeite. I hope kids are resilient and manage to recover time & experiences lost.

We reached 70% of population vaccinated already, 92/93% over 12s. The talk is that there will be easing of some restrictions end of October, like the need to wear masks for schools, but remaining mandatory in places like public transport.
 
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Anne

Well-known member
Good news on the vaccine front for kids: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-19-vaccines-children-october-gottlieb-face-the-nation/

From a Disney standpoint, we'll probably still postpone our Thanksgiving trip. Still too many experiences shuttered for my liking.
Do you happen to have an on-site reservation for Thanksgiving you are canceling? We were thinking of going Thanksgiving if the vaccine comes through for the kids in time, but there are zero on-site rooms to be had.
 
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