Coronavirus

Micah008

Moderator
Staff member
I got my first dose yesterday through one of the Wisconsin "community based vaccination clinics" they setup around the state. They had a very good process, and I was in and out quickly. Officially our state doesn't open it up to everyone until tomorrow, but I got the invite a little early. After 24 hours I only have a slightly sore arm (less than my last Flu shot honestly). My second dose is scheduled for a Friday to be prepared for a few more side effects.

With my Mom and Grandmother (mid-90s) each getting their second dose this week, its nice to envision a time in the near future when we can do a holiday in person rather than over Zoom like we did today. :)
 
I got my first dose yesterday through one of the Wisconsin "community based vaccination clinics" they setup around the state. They had a very good process, and I was in and out quickly. Officially our state doesn't open it up to everyone until tomorrow, but I got the invite a little early. After 24 hours I only have a slightly sore arm (less than my last Flu shot honestly). My second dose is scheduled for a Friday to be prepared for a few more side effects.

With my Mom and Grandmother (mid-90s) each getting their second dose this week, its nice to envision a time in the near future when we can do a holiday in person rather than over Zoom like we did today. :)
Can’t wait to start getting everyone together again. It’s been rough for the older generation. We’ve had short individual visits outdoors here and there. It’s just nothing like us all being able to interact together.
 

3dadknight

Well-known member
I got my second Pfizer shot on Friday. Saturday afternoon I was down for the count and slept most of the day. Sore shoulders and neck made the evening very uncomfortable. By Sunday, I was fine. It is a big relief. Wife is fully vaccinated with Mederna and had a similar experience after her second shot. My sons and their girlfriends all are half-way there with Pfizer and will get their second shots all within the next 2 weeks. That means all us who can be vaccinated by the time we start our Drive to WDW at the end of May will be vaccinated. My 14 year old daughter is not eligible. She is well trained at CDC precautions, however, since she has been going to in-person school since August without incident. This trip will be interesting. It may be time get the creative juices flowing as it will be an interesting subject for a Trip Report.
 

geek1997

Active member
My husband and I got our first shots on Friday. Yay! And since I scheduled our appointments, we've had notifications from at least three other systems to schedule a vaccine. I'm not sure how other areas/states are doing it, but I felt like there wasn't a whole lot of information about how/where you were supposed to "sign up" for a vaccine. I just started signing up with all the available waitlists I could find, including hospital systems for which we are not patients.
 

Art Vandelay

that's a shame
My husband and I got our first shots on Friday. Yay! And since I scheduled our appointments, we've had notifications from at least three other systems to schedule a vaccine. I'm not sure how other areas/states are doing it, but I felt like there wasn't a whole lot of information about how/where you were supposed to "sign up" for a vaccine. I just started signing up with all the available waitlists I could find, including hospital systems for which we are not patients.
Same here. A bit frustrating, but it eventually worked out.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I'm not sure how other areas/states are doing it, but I felt like there wasn't a whole lot of information about how/where you were supposed to "sign up" for a vaccine. I just started signing up with all the available waitlists I could find, including hospital systems for which we are not patients.
There has been a lot of debate here on this topic. Our governor elected not to do a centralized system for scheduling vaccinations while the neighboring state of West Virginia did. Early on it appears that the centralized system was more efficient but as the vaccines become more plentiful, it appears to be less the case.
 

Mrs. Potts

Member
For our family it appears the mental impact of the past year is still a very real thing. We hosted our family’s Easter gathering yesterday, consisting of my (fully vaccinated) parents and my family. I am vaccinated also, but my spouse and children aren’t eligible yet. One of my daughters is high risk, but not old enough for the vaccine, so we all still take considerable precautions to prevent getting COVID.
My kids were so excited to see their grandparents for the first holiday in over a year! Unfortunately, my mom had a panic attack during the meal and left abruptly. She couldn’t handle eating outside of her home and being around my children who might be contagious but not feeling sick. She heard a news report say the “vaccine is equivalent to a fire suit, and if you had a fire suit you still wouldn’t walk into a fire” and feels she can’t go out even now to a low risk situation.
 

pixarprincess

Active member
For our family it appears the mental impact of the past year is still a very real thing. We hosted our family’s Easter gathering yesterday, consisting of my (fully vaccinated) parents and my family. I am vaccinated also, but my spouse and children aren’t eligible yet. One of my daughters is high risk, but not old enough for the vaccine, so we all still take considerable precautions to prevent getting COVID.
My kids were so excited to see their grandparents for the first holiday in over a year! Unfortunately, my mom had a panic attack during the meal and left abruptly. She couldn’t handle eating outside of her home and being around my children who might be contagious but not feeling sick. She heard a news report say the “vaccine is equivalent to a fire suit, and if you had a fire suit you still wouldn’t walk into a fire” and feels she can’t go out even now to a low risk situation.
I'm sorry it was not the joyus occasion it should have been. I think a lot of people are going to have a difficult transition back into "normal." We have gotten so used to staying home, and while it is good to have a healthy respect for how serious COVID is I think media and coverage for some has just created fear more than education. I've also seen a lot of joking lately about how none of us will know how to socialize anymore while it is somewhat humorus as its probably not far off from the truth. It is a bummer as it really is such an important part of the human experience. Hopefully as things begin to reopen and get back to more out of the house movement that your mom and others experiencing the same anxiety will begin to be more comfortable. (especially as numbers hopefully continue to decline as vaccines rise).
 

bnoble

he's right
For our family it appears the mental impact of the past year is still a very real thing.
I suspect it will take most of us longer than we think to wrap our heads around all of this. I've mentioned it before but I suspect it will be a good while before my wife and I eat at a restaurant indoors---not because there is a genuine risk, but because "it won't feel right." This Medium post is quite relevant, IMO:

 

pixarprincess

Active member
I suspect it will take most of us longer than we think to wrap our heads around all of this. I've mentioned it before but I suspect it will be a good while before my wife and I eat at a restaurant indoors---not because there is a genuine risk, but because "it won't feel right." This Medium post is quite relevant, IMO:

That article is dead on. Its going to be super duper weird. We just bought concert tickets for July. I am SOO looking forward to it but also a little apprehensive. We also did an easter event outdoors yesterday. One of 2 live events with a band and audiences for our company in 12 months and it was great, but real strange to be doing it again.
 
I suspect it will take most of us longer than we think to wrap our heads around all of this. I've mentioned it before but I suspect it will be a good while before my wife and I eat at a restaurant indoors---not because there is a genuine risk, but because "it won't feel right." This Medium post is quite relevant, IMO:

Being at ease again among friends and family, for us, I don't think that'll be hard at all. Attending events with thousands or tens of thousands of other people - that's another matter entirely. That Disney trip that was postponed last May? We'll be going to Montana instead.
 
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Strangeite

Well-known member
My oldest son is buying his first house, so for his Christmas and birthday presents we said we would take him to Ikea. So this Saturday, my wife, my son, his girlfriend and I drove the hour and half to Ikea and spent the entire morning shopping. I hate shopping in normal times, but even though we were all fully vaccinated, it felt weird.

It had a bit of a Twilight Zone feeling. Everything appeared normal but wasn't.

Meet the Cornett's. A family enjoying a morning buying the material goods necessary for starting a new chapter. Among the labyrinth of twists and turns of the showroom is everything needed to start a new home. However hidden between the cheap plastic nicknacks are items that can only be found in The Twilight Zone.
 

ThemeParkCommando

Active member
I suspect it will take most of us longer than we think to wrap our heads around all of this. I've mentioned it before but I suspect it will be a good while before my wife and I eat at a restaurant indoors---not because there is a genuine risk, but because "it won't feel right." This Medium post is quite relevant, IMO:

I just keep remembering that statistically, this virus doesn't kill that many. Un-statistically, one is too many if it is someone you love, I do get that.

The current death rate in the US, of people who have actually gotten the virus, is less than 2%. So it's even smaller if you count all the people in the US that haven't gotten the virus or have never been tested.
I will be happy to return to a no mask state. Before COVID, I always had a sense of personal space, so I don't like people crowding and will keep them away. I can't wait to go back and eat in a restaurant. I have mine planned for the week of April 19th.

Before that, we will be visiting my inlaws, and my MIL cannot be vaccinated due to allergy issues to something they use in vaccine suspensions. She's reacted to the flu shot and the shingles shot, so her doctor has told her not to get the vaccine. Both hubby and I are fully vaccinated, and we are doing a heavy quarantine now so we can visit.

Personally, I've never gotten a flu shot, and I've never had the flu to my knowledge. I trust that my seemingly strong immune system will keep me from getting COVID in a normal crowd setting, now that I am vaccinated.
 

bnoble

he's right
I just keep remembering that statistically, this virus doesn't kill that many.
In the space of a year, north of 500K people in the US died from COVID. There are 330M people in the US. That's at least 150 dead per 100,000.

I just can't agree that 150 deaths per 100,000 people is "not that many" when we don't have any other infectious diseases in circulation that is closer than an order of magnitude less deadly.

Put another way: we have the largest stadium in the US. It seats about 110K people. You could fill it five times over with the people who have died from this disease. That's nothing short of tragic to me. I understand that other people don't see it that way, but I just can't agree with them.

And all this is ignoring the implications of "long COVID" which we don't even really understand yet.
 

RetroCOTfan

Active member
And all this is ignoring the implications of "long COVID" which we don't even really understand yet.
This - it's a forgotten/overlooked consequence of this. There are going to be millions of Americans who, thanks to this moment in time, now have a "pre-existing condition." Of course, it's impossible to see the future and know what politicians are going to do with American healthcare, but it's worth remembering, notwithstanding the physical effects those individuals will bear. Those who do not live with a chronic illness are quick to dismiss what it's like to do so.
 
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