Coronavirus

Disneyfan

Well-known member
Currently it looks like my age group will be vaccinated June! My husband is registering next week, he is bit older. I am getting my hopes up for Orladno holiday in 2022!!!
I am happy for you! It is such a relief to be fully vaccinated. The side affects from that second dose were not fun, but well worth it. I can hardly wait to get back to WDW.

The only down side is that I get annoyed when people close to me are not planning on getting vaccinated. I usually try to be respectful when someone has an opinion different than my own. But my oh my, this situation is different.

I am crossing my fingers for you hoping it works out. Happy planning for 2022, Nia!!
 
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Nia

Well-known member
I will start planning after we are all vaccinated, and as soon as but we are bit far form knowing what the situation will be with teens. But honestly I am in process of planning kitchen remodel and it's AWFUL process. I much rather cheat sheets and easy guide to disney trips :). Even the thought of being able to be vaccinated this summer gives me so much motivation!

Hope not many are refusing the vaccination. AZ and J&J are the two people aren't sure about in Europe, everyone wants Moderna and Pfizer but I will take whatever they offer me at this stage. I only know one person that declined vaccination, my in laws and family at risk is fully vaccinated and in few weeks will be able to get a hug from their grandchildren!

Disneyland California opening is also sign of end of it. Without talking about it with my husband he was saying do you think we will be able to handle Disney trip now yesterday and my son about what will we do on the next trip. I am feeling positive & happy for first time in long
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
The only down side is that I get annoyed when people close to me are not planning on getting vaccinated. I usually try to be respectful when someone has an opinion different than my own. But my oh my, this situation is different.
In my 40+ years on this planet I have always been an optimist and thought people were fundamentally good at their core. Most disagreements and challenges were due to external influences and not the result of human nature.

The past 18 months have challenged that view. I never would have guessed such a large percentage of the population were such selfish idiots.
 

bnoble

he's right
I think both are true. People---and that means all of them---are fundamentally selfish. But, people also generally want to be (or at least see themselves as) good people, and they do things that line up with that.

Reconciling that reality in myself has been a big part of my own recovery process, and being able to come to grips with it internally has made it easier for me to be compassionate with others who may not be as far along the journey. Don't get me wrong, I still react with resentment, frustration, and anger, but as a good friend puts it: I am responsible for my second thought and my first action.
 
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smwisc

Active member
Approval for adolescents could come as early as next week! And here I've been crossing my fingers for "before our planned trip in July". With two teens and an 8-year-old, I'll feel so much more comfortable having only the 8-year-old unvaccinated.

 

Disneyfan

Well-known member
I think both are true. People---and that means all of them---are fundamentally selfish. But, people also generally want to be (or at least see themselves as) good people, and they do things that line up with that.

Reconciling that reality in myself has been a big part of my own recovery process, and being able to come to grips with it internally has made it easier for me to be compassionate with others who may not be as far along the journey. Don't get me wrong, I still react with resentment, frustration, and anger, but as a good friend puts it: I am responsible for my second thought and my first action.
Very true! I especially like the last line of your post. I know that I can be very selfish. (Look how many times I use the word "I" in any post I make. :) )

I have never actually said anything to my "vaccine nervous" friends. But when asked how my vaccination went, I tell them it was rough but I am glad to do my part. Maybe I am a little passive aggressive. . .
 

Not That Josh

Well-known member
I think both are true. People---and that means all of them---are fundamentally selfish. But, people also generally want to be (or at least see themselves as) good people, and they do things that line up with that.

I think this is how I see people. Even while being selfish, people like to think they are good. This shows up in many ways and with many subjects, too many to list here (and some off topic for this site).

Reconciling that reality in myself has been a big part of my own recovery process, and being able to come to grips with it internally has made it easier for me to be compassionate with others who may not be as far along the journey. Don't get me wrong, I still react with resentment, frustration, and anger, but as a good friend puts it: I am responsible for my second thought and my first action.

I think, and hope, I do a good job accepting this in others (and myself). Like you said, the frustration still comes though.
 

Not That Josh

Well-known member
If 100 million people get the vaccine with minimal side effects, no one talks about it. If a small percentage feel bad, the news is covering all of them. This clearly helps people feel justified in their uncertainty about covid vaccines.

I understand it's how news works, but it really adds to the difficulty of convincing the hesitant.

I know this is obvious, but I ended up thinking about it today.
 

Not That Josh

Well-known member
I have seen a couple of stories with epidemiologists saying that they think it's unlikely this virus will ever go away completely. This is partially due to how the virus spreads with ease, and some due to the reality that not enough people will be vaccinated to stop it.

If this is how things go, seems like there are two likely outcomes (my guesses, not science):
1) The virus stays around forever like the flu.
2) The virus mutates into something worse.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I have seen a couple of stories with epidemiologists saying that they think it's unlikely this virus will ever go away completely. This is partially due to how the virus spreads with ease, and some due to the reality that not enough people will be vaccinated to stop it.
Exactly.

150 years from now, history classes will be taught on this exact era.
 

moscow

Active member
Approval for adolescents could come as early as next week! And here I've been crossing my fingers for "before our planned trip in July". With two teens and an 8-year-old, I'll feel so much more comfortable having only the 8-year-old unvaccinated.


I think there is something wrong with my kids. My 11 year old son -- very soon to be 12 -- proudly announced to one of his friends on a zoom call that he was getting his vaccine for his birthday . . . and he couldn't wait. LOL!
 

RetroCOTfan

Active member
I think there is something wrong with my kids. My 11 year old son -- very soon to be 12 -- proudly announced to one of his friends on a zoom call that he was getting his vaccine for his birthday . . . and he couldn't wait. LOL!
I'm right there with you. When he heard on the news that Moderna was looking for adolescents in our area for their trial, my 13-yr-old made his mom sign him up immediately. Sadly, he wasn't chosen, but he certainly is ready to get his vaccination!
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I think there is something wrong with my kids. My 11 year old son -- very soon to be 12 -- proudly announced to one of his friends on a zoom call that he was getting his vaccine for his birthday . . . and he couldn't wait. LOL!
I'm right there with you. When he heard on the news that Moderna was looking for adolescents in our area for their trial, my 13-yr-old made his mom sign him up immediately. Sadly, he wasn't chosen, but he certainly is ready to get his vaccination!

Both of my unvaccinated kids (10 and 14) are desperately wanting to get vaccinated.
 

Micah008

Moderator
Staff member
My 10 and 13 year old kids are also wanting it, especially the 13 year old.

Some of their cousins are/were part of the Pfizer studies, and they have already gotten vaccinated when they later learned they were part of the placebo group in the official study.
 

jeep63

New member
I have seen a couple of stories with epidemiologists saying that they think it's unlikely this virus will ever go away completely. This is partially due to how the virus spreads with ease, and some due to the reality that not enough people will be vaccinated to stop it.

If this is how things go, seems like there are two likely outcomes (my guesses, not science):
1) The virus stays around forever like the flu.
2) The virus mutates into something worse.
I am no expert on this matter...

This is how I see this going; Covid will be like the seasonal flu, with a recommendation to get the Covid Shot every fall, or the flu shot will begin to include the Covid parts. I also do not believe everyone will take the shot, not out of selfish-ness, but for the same reason they do not get the flu shot; they feel the risk is acceptable.

Shaming people will only make them resist more, just get the shot and move on with your life knowing you are protected; allow those who choose not to get the shot to do the same.
 

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
just get the shot and move on with your life knowing you are protected; allow those who choose not to get the shot to do the same.
The problem is that it ignores any ethical/moral obligation to care for those who cannot get the shot (for whatever reason). Behaving only in self-interest is largely responsible for where we're at right now...
 

bnoble

he's right
There is a common belief that we are self-sufficient, and need only concern ourselves with ourselves; that the myriad ways we depend on one another simply don't exist; that any suffering someone else experiences is inevitably a mark of their own failure to do enough of "the right things," and so we have no particular obligation to help them, because it is "their own fault."

I can't accept that for several reasons. One: bad things happen to good people, because the universe is not under our control. Your fortunes are not entirely dependent on your fortitude. Two: so much is dependent on the accident of birth and that is clearly outside our control. I was lucky to be born into a family with significant social and material resources; consequently, my kids had that good fortune as well. Globally, there aren't that many people who share in that. Even locally, a few miles can make all the difference. Three: I have personally been on the receiving end of grace, and so it seems incumbent on me to offer the same to others. I know a lot of people who disagree with me--some are in my extended family. Watching them, it seems like it must be a big burden to go through life so very angry. I sure wish some of those people that I know and love could drop the rock.
 
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