I'm just saying...

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
If you don't have a plan for your next broth use, you can always portion it out and freeze it for later (and if you're like me, discover it a year later and wonder if it's too freezer burned to use...).
I do this with tomato paste, which I usually only need a tablespoon or two from a 6 oz can. Take the top and bottom off the can, freeze it solid, then push it out and slice into 1T portions, then back in the freezer in an airtight bag.
 

Micah008

Moderator
Staff member
We buy egg whites in cartons with the same type of problem as the broth, but they need to be in the fridge before and after opening. Although pasteurized we still make sure to write the date opened on the top of it.

I do this with tomato paste, which I usually only need a tablespoon or two from a 6 oz can. Take the top and bottom off the can, freeze it solid, then push it out and slice into 1T portions, then back in the freezer in an airtight bag.
We have done with tomato paste too, and we also freeze chopped up onions into cubes to be able to easily throw into a dish.
 

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
If you don't have a plan for your next broth use, you can always portion it out and freeze it for later (and if you're like me, discover it a year later and wonder if it's too freezer burned to use...).
Yeah that's what *I* would do, but when I notice the box in the back of the top shelf of the fridge and I ask my wife "when did you use that," and neither of us can remember the last dish she made that called for broth... it's "too late" in my book.

Which reminds me of this classic SNL sketch...

 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
We buy egg whites in cartons with the same type of problem as the broth, but they need to be in the fridge before and after opening. Although pasteurized we still make sure to write the date opened on the top of it.


We have done with tomato paste too, and we also freeze chopped up onions into cubes to be able to easily throw into a dish.
I'm a freezing fiend, and will freeze just about anything. I've never done onions, since I can chop them pretty quickly "a la minute," as they say, and freezing definitely changes the structure of vegetables that aren't blanched first. I also have a bag of frozen chipotles in adobo, since recipes usually only call for small amounts.
 

paxsarah

Active member
I have a pen holder on my fridge that has a sharpie and a pencil in it. If you think I'm about to tell you that I use the sharpie to mark all of my opened containers with the date...you'd be wrong. :ROFLMAO: But I definitely should do that!
 

RetroCOTfan

Active member
Yeah that's what *I* would do, but when I notice the box in the back of the top shelf of the fridge and I ask my wife "when did you use that," and neither of us can remember the last dish she made that called for broth... it's "too late" in my book.

Which reminds me of this classic SNL sketch...

Thanks for sharing that sketch - I'd never seen it! Man, I miss Chris Farley...
 

smwisc

Active member
I do this with tomato paste, which I usually only need a tablespoon or two from a 6 oz can. Take the top and bottom off the can, freeze it solid, then push it out and slice into 1T portions, then back in the freezer in an airtight bag.
Much better method than messy spoons-full - mind blown!
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I do this with tomato paste, which I usually only need a tablespoon or two from a 6 oz can. Take the top and bottom off the can, freeze it solid, then push it out and slice into 1T portions, then back in the freezer in an airtight bag.
I have seen this trick before but I find the toothpaste like tube of tomato paste much more convenient.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I gave up and bought the sqeeze tube. That seems to keep reasonably well in the fridge.

(Er, what @Strangeite said.)
I am sure that @George method is more economical, environmental and allows for more precise measurements (the tube doesn't dispense into a measuring spoon evenly), but at the end of the day, I am lazy. So I buy the toothpaste tomato paste.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
I am sure that @George method is more economical, environmental and allows for more precise measurements (the tube doesn't dispense into a measuring spoon evenly), but at the end of the day, I am lazy. So I buy the toothpaste tomato paste.
I use enough tomato paste to make the tubes a really bad value, but not enough to use a full can (unless I’m making a Bolognese, in which case I use a whole pint.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I use enough tomato paste to make the tubes a really bad value, but not enough to use a full can (unless I’m making a Bolognese, in which case I use a whole pint.
You either use a way more tomato paste than I can comprehend or way more frugal than me. Either way, I am impressed.

Edit:

(unless I’m making a Bolognese, in which case I use a whole pint.
This has to be a joke.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
You either use a way more tomato paste than I can comprehend or way more frugal than me. Either way, I am impressed.

Edit:



This has to be a joke.
Nope. It’s the only tomato product in the sauce. Water, tomato paste, mirepoix, red wine, ground beef, bay leaf. If you have four hours sometime you should make it; it’s amazing. I like Anne Burrell’s recipe. At least watch the video.

Anne Burrell’s Bolognese
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
Nope. It’s the only tomato product in the sauce. Water, tomato paste, mirepoix, red wine, ground beef, bay leaf. If you have four hours sometime you should make it; it’s amazing. I like Anne Burrell’s recipe. At least watch the video.

Anne Burrell’s Bolognese
I am giving you the side eye because i) I have always used Cook's Illustrated Bolognese recipe and it takes WAY more than four hours and ii) there ain't no milk in that recipe and iii) you telling me that you can make a good bolognese in four hours?
 

smwisc

Active member
I am giving you the side eye because i) I have always used Cook's Illustrated Bolognese recipe and it takes WAY more than four hours and ii) there ain't no milk in that recipe and iii) you telling me that you can make a good bolognese in four hours?
I am now ashamed to admit I've never made Bolognese, intrigued by this debate over recipes and methods, and amused by this line of the recipe:
"BROWN THE BEEF! Brown food tastes good. "
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
I am giving you the side eye because i) I have always used Cook's Illustrated Bolognese recipe and it takes WAY more than four hours and ii) there ain't no milk in that recipe and iii) you telling me that you can make a good bolognese in four hours?
Cooks takes about 3-1/2 hours according to their recipe, and they add things line chicken livers and mortadella to theirs. I’ve found many ATK/Cook’s pastas to be more EYEtalian than Italian, and am often disappointed with them.

There’s some debate about if milk belongs in Bolognese. Anne doesn’t, and Lidia Bastianich doesn’t either. If you like it, by all means put it in, as recipes are merely guides. As for time, Anne’s takes more like five to five and a half hours, including the essential browning of the pestata, tomato paste, and beef. Taking the sauce to the “edge of disaster” before adding more water is the key to this one, and the technique that really develops the rich flavors.
 

Anne

Well-known member
I am now ashamed to admit I've never made Bolognese, intrigued by this debate over recipes and methods, and amused by this line of the recipe:
"BROWN THE BEEF! Brown food tastes good. "
I've never made it either. It was always my dad's thing and now my brother has taken over making it. They make big vats and then I get quarts of sauce for my freezer (is that bad to freeze the sauce?) Seeing the recipe I'm now intrigued...maybe I'll give it a whirl some weekend.

My tomato paste method:
1. open can 2. use small amount, 3. place in fridge covered in plastic wrap 4. find partially used can weeks later in back of fridge with plastic wrap half off or completely missing 5. throw can out.
 
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