Interesting comments on recent increase in wait times at park

bruisedcrew

New member
I really doubt that Disney is intentionally reducing capacity.

I agree with Josh's comment about one of the biggest impacts of FP+ being the reduction or elimination of rerides for the most popular attractions. And, frankly, I think that's a good thing. The daily ride capacity for those popular attractions is generally lower than the number of people who would like to experience them, so getting more people a crack at one ride with a short wait seems like a positive to me, even if it means the people who boasted about getting 3 or 4 FPs for one ride in a day aren't happy about it. I also agree that, while some of the standby lines may be significantly longer, there are probably fewer people waiting in those lines as more of the capacity is allocated to FP. My guess is that the small percentage of power users are doing fewer total rides (including fewer rerides) but a much larger percentage of less experienced users are enjoying more rides. Disney probably has a pretty good handle on this based on their surveys and information about FP usage.

Experienced guests with a good plan still are going to be able to do more than less experienced and less knowledgeable guests. But FP+ has probably narrowed that gap and that is probably a result Disney likes, even if the elite group of power users (who are over represented on Disney forums) are not happy about it.
 

stevenmilz

josh's date at akershus
Here's my take and two-cents on the subject... the ability to predict WDW crowd levels and expected waits is much more an "art" than a "science" and I think we can see that Josh has perfected his "art" much more than other sites have been able to perfect their "science". Trying to use the posted wait times in "science" just won't work because those numbers aren't always valid. I think we can all agree that posted wait times that switch from 80 minutes to 20 minutes within 15 minutes have to be bogus. Trying to use those data points for accurate predictions is definitely going to corrupt the "science". Now let's imagine a situation where we could make the "science" work... if Disney recorded the actual wait time of each and every guest wearing a MB from the time they entered the queue to the time they got on the ride, we would have the actual numbers needed for a scientific wait-time prediction. But of course we need to consider a few things... (1) we would only capture times for guests with MBs, but that's probably a good enough sample; (2) the starting timestamp would need to be taken as soon as the guest enters the queue, so on busy days where extended queues that don't start where the 'official' queue starts are used, the starting timestamps would be off; and (3) there's no way in holy you-know-where that Disney would ever make this data available - it would be like those actual wait times that Josh was able to capture for a few weeks that got abruptly cut off. So in the end, we're left with the "art" of WDW predictions as our best bet, and I'll put my money on Josh being the best at that for the foreseeable future.

A couple observations that go along with this discussion. We just got back from a five-day Food and Wine trip where we rode a few of our favorite rides, but not a lot.

1. On Friday, Oct 23rd, CL7, we went to DHS (recommended). We were literally the first two regular guests in the park (that's a story in itself) and at the "tape scrape" they told us TSMM was down. They didn't tell us that the queue wasn't even open. When we got there, the huge mass of people basically jammed up Pixar Place waiting for word on what was going on. The white shirt CM "in charge" said he didn't expect it to come online until at least 10am. Many people abandoned ship and left but many of us stayed (we had nothing else planned right away so we stayed). At 9:25am it came back up and we entered the queue and rode, for downtime of about 40 minutes. When we got off, the queue was full, with the extended queue almost down to the entrance of the old Backlot Tour and back up towards TSMM! The standby was posted at 60 minutes, but it was probably close to 100 because you were going to have a TON of people with FP+ from 9am to 9:25am coming back during what amounts to a 35 minute window vs a 60 minute window. We didn't check back on TSMM later in the day but I assume it was probably a mess...

2. Same day we had FP+ for Safari at AK at 11:40am. We got there around noon and the FP+ line was huge. I told DW and the folks in front of us that we'd be on the ride in 10 minutes; they all told me no way, that I was crazy. 7 minutes later we were on a truck.

3. Yesterday, Monday Oct 26th, back at DHS (recommended). We rode TSMM at rope drop (not down this time!) then headed to ToT with a 9:05am FP+ (we were spending only two hours in the park before heading back to Epcot for F&W seminars). We got to ToT around 9:15am and decided to ride twice, first standby then using our FP+. The standby line was walk-on (really, not a single person in standby). When we got to the boarding area we saw that they were only using two of the four elevators. When we got back to the entrance to use our FP+, standby was up to 35 minutes and the entire queue was filled, almost out to the entrance gates. We got on for ride #2 in less than 10 minutes using FP+. That whole situation is something that's impossible to scientifically predict.
 

SteveK

New member
... the ability to predict WDW crowd levels and expected waits is much more an "art" than a "science" and I think we can see that Josh has perfected his "art" much more than other sites have been able to perfect their "science".
Wholehearted agreement here. Without being too critical, in an editorial overview sense the TP team appears to be overextended, so that number-checking suffers. Even simple "data" like drive times in the 2016 UG Hotel Information Chart need to be checked...some clear errors have been in there for several editions now. If those numbers aren't being quality-controlled, who knows what's going into the wait-time data? I will still buy the UG because the room ratings info is useful to me. For wait times, I'll stick with the artist.
 

ajj221

New member
Here's my take and two-cents on the subject... the ability to predict WDW crowd levels and expected waits is much more an "art" than a "science" and I think we can see that Josh has perfected his "art" much more than other sites have been able to perfect their "science". Trying to use the posted wait times in "science" just won't work because those numbers aren't always valid. I think we can all agree that posted wait times that switch from 80 minutes to 20 minutes within 15 minutes have to be bogus. Trying to use those data points for accurate predictions is definitely going to corrupt the "science". Now let's imagine a situation where we could make the "science" work... if Disney recorded the actual wait time of each and every guest wearing a MB from the time they entered the queue to the time they got on the ride, we would have the actual numbers needed for a scientific wait-time prediction. But of course we need to consider a few things... (1) we would only capture times for guests with MBs, but that's probably a good enough sample; (2) the starting timestamp would need to be taken as soon as the guest enters the queue, so on busy days where extended queues that don't start where the 'official' queue starts are used, the starting timestamps would be off; and (3) there's no way in holy you-know-where that Disney would ever make this data available - it would be like those actual wait times that Josh was able to capture for a few weeks that got abruptly cut off. So in the end, we're left with the "art" of WDW predictions as our best bet, and I'll put my money on Josh being the best at that for the foreseeable future.

A couple observations that go along with this discussion. We just got back from a five-day Food and Wine trip where we rode a few of our favorite rides, but not a lot.

1. On Friday, Oct 23rd, CL7, we went to DHS (recommended). We were literally the first two regular guests in the park (that's a story in itself) and at the "tape scrape" they told us TSMM was down. They didn't tell us that the queue wasn't even open. When we got there, the huge mass of people basically jammed up Pixar Place waiting for word on what was going on. The white shirt CM "in charge" said he didn't expect it to come online until at least 10am. Many people abandoned ship and left but many of us stayed (we had nothing else planned right away so we stayed). At 9:25am it came back up and we entered the queue and rode, for downtime of about 40 minutes. When we got off, the queue was full, with the extended queue almost down to the entrance of the old Backlot Tour and back up towards TSMM! The standby was posted at 60 minutes, but it was probably close to 100 because you were going to have a TON of people with FP+ from 9am to 9:25am coming back during what amounts to a 35 minute window vs a 60 minute window. We didn't check back on TSMM later in the day but I assume it was probably a mess...

2. Same day we had FP+ for Safari at AK at 11:40am. We got there around noon and the FP+ line was huge. I told DW and the folks in front of us that we'd be on the ride in 10 minutes; they all told me no way, that I was crazy. 7 minutes later we were on a truck.

3. Yesterday, Monday Oct 26th, back at DHS (recommended). We rode TSMM at rope drop (not down this time!) then headed to ToT with a 9:05am FP+ (we were spending only two hours in the park before heading back to Epcot for F&W seminars). We got to ToT around 9:15am and decided to ride twice, first standby then using our FP+. The standby line was walk-on (really, not a single person in standby). When we got to the boarding area we saw that they were only using two of the four elevators. When we got back to the entrance to use our FP+, standby was up to 35 minutes and the entire queue was filled, almost out to the entrance gates. We got on for ride #2 in less than 10 minutes using FP+. That whole situation is something that's impossible to scientifically predict.

I have another example similar to these

First, on Saturday 10/24 about 11:45 we had the same experience for Safari w/FP/ The FP pre-scan line was out the door around the corner, but we were on a truck within 10 minutes. It took about 5 to get scanned and walk to the 2nd scan point (never even slowed down) and then another 5 to get on a truck.

Second, Monday 10/26 at Epcot Test Track.
10:45 rode with FP+ and took about 20 minutes until we were on the ride. Standby was backed up out the door and single rider looked pretty full. Single rider with us said she waited about 15 minutes to ride.
11:15 exited and went to ride again with complimentary FP (GM employee). The FP line was backed up out the door and snaked through chains outside the building. I asked what was going on/if we should come back and the CM told me he thought a car had stopped for a few minutes. So we left as we didn't have a time frame on our extra FP.
1:00 returned - rode with FP about 10 minutes to get on ride (didn't design a new car). Single rider line was empty basically. Standby on app said 80 minutes but was posted 40 at ride. No lines were outside the building including standby. I don't know what caused the waits to be so short at 1:00 compared to 10:45. Downtime? Traffic patterns of people in the park? Capacity? But I think this is another example where timing / luck can make a difference.

3. I think geographic proximity makes a difference on some rides. I think lines for Pooh are longer faster due to the proximity to mine train. When someone approaches at 9:15 and sees an hour long line they move to Pooh. On Sunday 10/25 At 9:10/9:15 when we entered the Pooh line it was posted as 5 minutes. It changed to 20 while we were waiting. We got off the ride at 9:30. I think Jungle Cruise and Alladin are high when Pirates is down.

Same day I saw a 5 minute wait for BTMRR posted at 9:45, but by the time we got over there to see the sign it was 35 minutes at 10:00 am. I think there was a delay in updating the wait time/app.

I also think there are a lot more people using FP now than a year ago and I think the result is more capacity is allocated to FP. I also think Capacity is adjusted on some rides to keep waits in a target range. e.g Tea Cups and Carousel adjust capacity by shortening the ride time to move more people through per hour. I have seen ETWB several times and we felt that the show was shortened this time. Many of the kids playing characters never really had any part in the show except for the parade.

The only wait that ended up being longer in the afternoon than I expected was Buzz. It increased pretty fast after 10:00 am and never seemed to go down. At 6:45 on a party night it was still posted at 20 or 30 minutes. Even mine train only showed 40 at that point.
 

avab80

New member
This may be a dumb noob question, but is there intel on how accurate Disney's posted wait times are in general, beyond individual reports of personal experiences? Since all the data is based on posted wait times, if those wait times are inaccurate more often than not, the data becomes essentially useless in practice. We all know Disney posts inflated wait times near park closing to discourage people from getting in line, but do they perhaps do this at other times in an attempt to control/move crowds?

This can also play into the issue of people using FP+ when it's not really necessary, thereby driving up the SB wait time. For example, we used a FP+ at the Mickey & Minnie meet in AK around 9:30am when the posted wait was 20 minutes. The CM who came to bring us into the character room basically scolded us for not knowing how FP+ works, because the wait was "only like 2 minutes" and I could change my FP+ to something else. I told him the sign outside said 20 minutes; if it had said 5 minutes, I would have gotten into the SB line instead.

If Disney doesn't post accurate wait times, no one can make well-informed decisions or predictions.
 

jmannwv

New member
if you read touring plans documentation, they look at the average wait times during the day on a set of major attractions at each of the four parks and then compare that avg wait time against avg wait times from the last year and then rate the park crowds from 1-10 based on where the day falls in the distribution of days from the last year. In essence they are using avg wait times as a proxy for how crowded the park is.

In my opinion, their entire model has been rendered invalid by the advent and adoption of FP+. As everyone has pointed out, standby times are up as more and more people use FP+ and more and more capacity is allocated to FP+. Thus, the higher standby wait times are a function of FP+ usage and not an indicator at all that parks are more or less crowded.

What would be really interesting to know is how standby times at different rides are impacted by marginal changes in % of capacity dedicated to FP+. Josh has said about 70% is dedicated to FP+, but my hypothesis would be that there is a big difference in standby wait times at 65% vs 70% vs 75% for a ride. Even a change of 1 or 2% could significantly increase a standby queue.
 

josh

Administrator
Staff member
This may be a dumb noob question, but is there intel on how accurate Disney's posted wait times are in general, beyond individual reports of personal experiences? Since all the data is based on posted wait times.
It's not a dumb question at all. For the most part, Disney wait times are reasonably accurate. In a micro sense, you can absolutely run into 60-minute wait at Soarin' at 8:42pm and be reasonably sure that the actual wait is going to be closer to 15, for example. Disney also often posts high wait times early because they can't keep up with changing it higher later. Like Test Track is always going to post 30 minutes first thing. It would either be that or post 5 minutes for 30 seconds, then 10 minutes for 30 seconds, then 20 minutes for 30 seconds, then 30 minutes for 30 seconds, etc. as people stream in. In a macro sense, if you see a 35 minute for ______ attraction, you can be reasonably sure that it's going to be somewhere between 30 and 40 minutes. On your meet and greet, it has a terrible capacity and wait times can skyrocket with FP+ returners so posting 20 minutes is "safe." They are not necessarily purposefully lying to you so you use FP+ or go somewhere else. It's just that operationally, based on history, the wait very well could be 20 minutes at that point. But one nice thing about pulling wait times at every attraction, in five minute intervals, all day, every day, is the ability to look at the trends from day to day. And living here in Orlando and visiting the parks a few times a week for the last five years, I see a lot of what these lines and crowds look like on a weekly basis. So using posted waits is not a perfect analysis, but it's the best we can do.
 

avab80

New member
It's not a dumb question at all. For the most part, Disney wait times are reasonably accurate. In a micro sense, you can absolutely run into 60-minute wait at Soarin' at 8:42pm and be reasonably sure that the actual wait is going to be closer to 15, for example. Disney also often posts high wait times early because they can't keep up with changing it higher later. Like Test Track is always going to post 30 minutes first thing. It would either be that or post 5 minutes for 30 seconds, then 10 minutes for 30 seconds, then 20 minutes for 30 seconds, then 30 minutes for 30 seconds, etc. as people stream in. In a macro sense, if you see a 35 minute for ______ attraction, you can be reasonably sure that it's going to be somewhere between 30 and 40 minutes. On your meet and greet, it has a terrible capacity and wait times can skyrocket with FP+ returners so posting 20 minutes is "safe." They are not necessarily purposefully lying to you so you use FP+ or go somewhere else. It's just that operationally, based on history, the wait very well could be 20 minutes at that point. But one nice thing about pulling wait times at every attraction, in five minute intervals, all day, every day, is the ability to look at the trends from day to day. And living here in Orlando and visiting the parks a few times a week for the last five years, I see a lot of what these lines and crowds look like on a weekly basis. So using posted waits is not a perfect analysis, but it's the best we can do.
Thank you Josh, that makes a lot of sense. In the situation I posted, I was mostly perturbed because of the way the CM spoke to me like I didn't know what I was doing. And while we didn't wait 20 minutes, we definitely waited more than the "like 2" he quoted me, even with using our FP.

I also wonder, for meet & greets, is the posted wait time the time from entering the line until you are actually meeting the character? Or just until your party enters the room where the character is? I know they usually have 1-2 groups "on deck" at a time in the room with the character, which makes sense to keep the line moving, but that is a PAINFUL 5-10 minutes when you have a toddler who is screaming because she can see Mickey but it's still not her turn yet.
 

Anne

Well-known member
In the situation I posted, I was mostly perturbed because of the way the CM spoke to me like I didn't know what I was doing. And while we didn't wait 20 minutes, we definitely waited more than the "like 2" he quoted me, even with using our FP.

...but that is a PAINFUL 5-10 minutes when you have a toddler who is screaming because she can see Mickey but it's still not her turn yet.
We must have had the same CM for Mickey :RpS_biggrin: except on our day after the scolding they just moved us over to the standby line and didn't bother to scan our bands (although it didn't matter because we were leaving for the night right after meeting Mickey).

I can totally sympathize on the "feels long" after you get in the meeting room. It felt that way for every character meet we did and from start to finish it was probably 20-30 minutes total time for every meet even with fp. If only there were socially acceptable blinders for small children.
 

MinnieUNC

New member
Wow, what a discussion, it makes my head hurt trying to take it all in. After years (beginning in late 90's) pre-school, then taking our kids out of school for wonderful Disney weeks, no planned ahead days.. or rope-drops, days with no crowds at attractions or in the streets; the ability to pretty-much make our choice of dinner reservations, day of, plus memories of our family riding Space Mt, RNR, etc. 12+ times each, over and over no wait, lots of magical personal attention from cast members, etc. this is all quite depressing. I've told my kids to cherish those truly magical memories, because their (future) kids sadly will never experience anything similar.
After missing Disney for a few years due to kids being in college (where they can't afford to miss a week of classes)our family's last week-long trip began Jan. 2, 2014. At first, I was a bit overwhelmed pre-planning with the FP+ stuff, but with that whole system being new, at the time only for those staying on-site, we adjusted and it worked well for us.
This up-coming November trip, kind-of a last minute, birthday surprise trip for me, the whole FP+ reservations (plus dinning reservations) thing has been mostly a fail. We are staying at Pop Century(couldn't..or wouldn't afford our usual, loved POR), and going to be in the parks Nov. 16-20. Josh has the 16th a crowd-level 4, all other days 2's and 3's. We are planning to visit Josh's most recommended park each day, and although months behind most other on-site guests, we did have our on-site reservations/ were able to make FP+ reservations 1 1/2 weeks before off-site guests could get into the FP+ reservation system for those dates. But even before the off-site crowd could choose FP+, there were no FP+ left any of our days for 7 dwarfs, TSMM, plus a few others, and the only ones left for RNR were in the afternoon! Several other available attraction FP+ times were not optimal. Additionally, Nov. 20 is my birthday, so we wanted a sit-down meal (not breakfast)in MK that day, only thing (so far, I will keep checking back) available has been Plaza for a mid-afternoon meal. There's no reservations available any days/times for other favorite restaurants throughout WDW(I wasn't even trying for the most popular, only going to get a ressie if you are on the phone 180 days out, ones.)
So this is what WDW, and the most recommended parks with crowd level 2's-3's, look like these days??? Very demoralizing. I know we'll have a good time once we're there.. regardless. But with memories of how easy, spontaneous, and truly magical things once were, I hate all the stress of pre-planning, and the disappointment knowing, although staying on-site during a supposedly low-crowd week, we will not be able to experience some of our favorite things, or will most-likely spend long times in line for the opportunity. With the exception of a crazy 4 day trip with my youngest daughter's middle-school, President's week 8 years ago, first time ever, we're planning on making rope-drops, and following plans for our days.
 

patdoc98

New member
Wow, what a discussion, it makes my head hurt trying to take it all in. After years (beginning in late 90's) pre-school, then taking our kids out of school for wonderful Disney weeks, no planned ahead days.. or rope-drops, days with no crowds at attractions or in the streets; the ability to pretty-much make our choice of dinner reservations, day of, plus memories of our family riding Space Mt, RNR, etc. 12+ times each, over and over no wait, lots of magical personal attention from cast members, etc. this is all quite depressing. I've told my kids to cherish those truly magical memories, because their (future) kids sadly will never experience anything similar.
After missing Disney for a few years due to kids being in college (where they can't afford to miss a week of classes)our family's last week-long trip began Jan. 2, 2014. At first, I was a bit overwhelmed pre-planning with the FP+ stuff, but with that whole system being new, at the time only for those staying on-site, we adjusted and it worked well for us.
This up-coming November trip, kind-of a last minute, birthday surprise trip for me, the whole FP+ reservations (plus dinning reservations) thing has been mostly a fail. We are staying at Pop Century(couldn't..or wouldn't afford our usual, loved POR), and going to be in the parks Nov. 16-20. Josh has the 16th a crowd-level 4, all other days 2's and 3's. We are planning to visit Josh's most recommended park each day, and although months behind most other on-site guests, we did have our on-site reservations/ were able to make FP+ reservations 1 1/2 weeks before off-site guests could get into the FP+ reservation system for those dates. But even before the off-site crowd could choose FP+, there were no FP+ left any of our days for 7 dwarfs, TSMM, plus a few others, and the only ones left for RNR were in the afternoon! Several other available attraction FP+ times were not optimal. Additionally, Nov. 20 is my birthday, so we wanted a sit-down meal (not breakfast)in MK that day, only thing (so far, I will keep checking back) available has been Plaza for a mid-afternoon meal. There's no reservations available any days/times for other favorite restaurants throughout WDW(I wasn't even trying for the most popular, only going to get a ressie if you are on the phone 180 days out, ones.)
So this is what WDW, and the most recommended parks with crowd level 2's-3's, look like these days??? Very demoralizing. I know we'll have a good time once we're there.. regardless. But with memories of how easy, spontaneous, and truly magical things once were, I hate all the stress of pre-planning, and the disappointment knowing, although staying on-site during a supposedly low-crowd week, we will not be able to experience some of our favorite things, or will most-likely spend long times in line for the opportunity. With the exception of a crazy 4 day trip with my youngest daughter's middle-school, President's week 8 years ago, first time ever, we're planning on making rope-drops, and following plans for our days.
A lot of people are as bummed as you are.

I do think it's still very, very possible to have a blast and to experience lots of the great things that WDW has to offer, under your circumstances.

For dining, a lot of people overbook ADRs, so you should check from 72 to 24 hours before you want a reservation, and ADRs will come open. (They will be snatched up quickly, but if you check a lot, for example on the evening of November 18 and the morning of the 19th, you'll probably find a decent ADR even for the most sought-after table service restaurants.)

You can definitely re-ride a lot of stuff if you use rope drop. It's certainly not like it once was, but you can easily ride 30 things from 9 am - 7 pm on a party night. Getting in line for Mine Train at 6:59 pm can be a great use of time, and a great way to end the night at MK.

Hope you have fun and bring back fond memories!
 

Reveley

New member
A lot of people are as bummed as you are.

I do think it's still very, very possible to have a blast and to experience lots of the great things that WDW has to offer, under your circumstances.

For dining, a lot of people overbook ADRs, so you should check from 72 to 24 hours before you want a reservation, and ADRs will come open. (They will be snatched up quickly, but if you check a lot, for example on the evening of November 18 and the morning of the 19th, you'll probably find a decent ADR even for the most sought-after table service restaurants.)

You can definitely re-ride a lot of stuff if you use rope drop. It's certainly not like it once was, but you can easily ride 30 things from 9 am - 7 pm on a party night. Getting in line for Mine Train at 6:59 pm can be a great use of time, and a great way to end the night at MK.

Hope you have fun and bring back fond memories!
Reminds me of the days when you could only make dining reservations day-of and my parents would go to that special phone at the front of the park right when we got there to make our dinner reservations for that evening.
 

ajj221

New member
It would be interesting to know the time that FP+ saves at certain attractions. The meet and greet example before is a good one. If the wait is going to be 10 minutes after the Merge and the standby is posted as 10 minutes then the savings would be 0. Most rides are like Buzz and Safari where the wait after the merge is very little. TT can have a significant wait after the merge to design a car and then wait to load.
 

bnoble

he's right
TT can have a significant wait after the merge to design a car and then wait to load.
Usually, Disney counts the "standby time" as the time from getting in line to the pre-show. So, they only "count" the time up to (but not including) the car design station.
 

avab80

New member
Usually, Disney counts the "standby time" as the time from getting in line to the pre-show. So, they only "count" the time up to (but not including) the car design station.
So for a meet & greet, would the standby time be the time from getting in line until you enter the meeting room? We always waited at least 10 minutes once we got into the meeting room for meet & greets, which I personally would count as time waiting not as time "on the attraction."
 

lawgman

New member
Sorry to resurrect this thread. Wouldn't 4 parties per week be a huge contributing factor to wait times, even on party days? The parties encourage people to go to other parks AND at the same time cut capacity at MK for the day (the amount of time available for rides and fast passes at MK is reduced). When MK is open late (possible only 1 time on a typical trip), it is jammed. I will be at Magic Kingdom on Nov 17th. Even though its a 3, I predict long waits for me that day. There is a party that night, HS closes in the afternoon, AK has its usual close. That just leaves very little capacity among the 4 parks.

If Disney reduced parties to 2 times a week during the fall, I think that would open up capacity significantly.
 

meremac

New member
Sorry to resurrect this thread. Wouldn't 4 parties per week be a huge contributing factor to wait times, even on party days? The parties encourage people to go to other parks AND at the same time cut capacity at MK for the day (the amount of time available for rides and fast passes at MK is reduced). When MK is open late (possible only 1 time on a typical trip), it is jammed. I will be at Magic Kingdom on Nov 17th. Even though its a 3, I predict long waits for me that day. There is a party that night, HS closes in the afternoon, AK has its usual close. That just leaves very little capacity among the 4 parks.

If Disney reduced parties to 2 times a week during the fall, I think that would open up capacity significantly.

This. Exactly. I'm wondering if waits will go back to (somewhat) normal after the party season. This week comes with a brief respite from the parties...if wait times seem to be a bit more tolerable this week, that would be a good sign.
 

3dadknight

Well-known member
I saw it and am wondering what the point of it is. They keep pointing to charts to show trends but then say there are no trends. In the Epcot portion, they seem to conclude that 60% of the increase in wait times is due to maelstrom closing. The average increase for Soarin from 2014 to 2015 is 5 minutes. They apparently can't figure out what's causing the other 2 minutes of extra wait time. Basically, their data shows that between 10:00 and 5:00 on a select group of attractions, you will wait an additional 2-4 minutes per attraction on average. Considering I'm using FPs at that time or am not even in the park, it really doesn't matter to me. The 2-4 minute increase apparently causes them to see CL 10's when they predicted CL 3's. :)
 
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