Keeping busy at home

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
I have a basic masterbuilt electric smoker that works on chips. It does a pretty decent job. All I've really used it for is pulled pork so far. It's so much better in the smoker than the slow cooker. We butterflied a turkey a couple years ago and did half in the oven and the other half in the smoker. That turned out pretty good.
 

Micah008

Moderator
Staff member
I have a Green Mountain Grill pellet grill here, and really like it, especially how well it keeps the temperature consistent with minimal work. We have done quite a few things on it, but our favorites have been ribs, pork shoulder steaks (like a section of a pork shoulder, but much quicker to make) and beef short ribs (similar to the point of the brisket, but easier). I recommend a pellet grill for minimal work, but there is still a bit of maintenance/cleaning to keep it working well.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
French Onion Soup Tarte Tatin, from Serious Eats. I haven't cut into this yet, but the house smells amazing and, except for the one onion wedge that clearly didn't come in contact with the pan, this is a serious looker. Usually a sweet dessert tart made with apples, this tarte tatin recipe is an adaptation which uses the savory ingredients of French Onion Soup, with a buttery pie crust. Carmelized, super-rich onions, boozy with Amotillado and a splash of Asian fish sauce, fill in the blanks between the raw onion wedges, and they're cooked on the stovetop before getting a hefty sprinkle of Gruyere cheese and a dijon mustard-slathered crust. Baked in the oven, it's then cooled a bit and inverted on a rack to cool.







 

smwisc

Active member
French Onion Soup Tarte Tatin, from Serious Eats. I haven't cut into this yet, but the house smells amazing and, except for the one onion wedge that clearly didn't come in contact with the pan, this is a serious looker. Usually a sweet dessert tart made with apples, this tarte tatin recipe is an adaptation which uses the savory ingredients of French Onion Soup, with a buttery pie crust. Carmelized, super-rich onions, boozy with Amotillado and a splash of Asian fish sauce, fill in the blanks between the raw onion wedges, and they're cooked on the stovetop before getting a hefty sprinkle of Gruyere cheese and a dijon mustard-slathered crust. Baked in the oven, it's then cooled a bit and inverted on a rack to cool.







Oh my. That looks (and sounds) amazing!
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
Lest you think all I do at home is cook, I can reassure you that I occasionally go down the occasional YouTube wormhole.

I re-discovered this recently, reminded about it when hearing about the new AMC Series "Soulmates." Grab your hankies.


And the follow-up:

 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
I like to plank mine on the grill. Plank soaks for 15-30 minutes, then simple olive oil, salt, pepper on top before it goes on a medium grill, covered, for about 10-15 minutes. This is a good source for inexpensive cedar. https://wildwoodgrillingoutlet.com/
Steven Raichlin just did a smoked planked salmon on the Big Green Egg (with heat diffuser in), and he argued that charring a dry plank imparts more of the cedar flavor into the fish than soaking. It invigorated the oils in the wood. Interesting concept.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
I would have to create a diffuser setup for mine..but definitely interesting.
He charred the plank on the rack before putting the diffuser in; bet you could do that and then cook with indirect heat, if you could keep the plank far enough away from the heat source. He did quite a large piece on the show, so it was a large plank.
 

geek1997

Member
I have found wood chips for my husband to use on etsy. More variety than the standard in grocery stores, etc. The last box I bought were Whiskey Barrel chips from BarHomeDesigns but I've also found wine barrel chips.
 

bnoble

he's right
Tonight's attempt:

Past experience has taught me that that 1T of salt is a *lot* of salt in the chili paste; I'm going with 1t plus a smidge to start. Using 1.5 oz New Mexico plus about 3/4oz chipotle. I've also found that seeding/steming them while dried is easier than after soaking (as long as they are not too old). There was no chuck at my store, so I went with a shoulder roast instead.

It's on the simmer now.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
That is my favorite style of chili.

It has been years since I have done it, so I am going to start the process today for making chicken and dumplings like my Nanny made, so we can have them for supper tomorrow.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
Tonight's attempt:

Past experience has taught me that that 1T of salt is a *lot* of salt in the chili paste; I'm going with 1t plus a smidge to start. Using 1.5 oz New Mexico plus about 3/4oz chipotle. I've also found that seeding/steming them while dried is easier than after soaking (as long as they are not too old). There was no chuck at my store, so I went with a shoulder roast instead.

It's on the simmer now.
That is my favorite style of chili.
How was it? I love that kind too. Though, truth be told, I like several different styles of chili, and have some favorite recipes for each kind culled from thirty-five years of making different kinds of chili, depending on my mood:

Ground beef with beans
Ground beef with bacon and black beans (much different flavor profile from the above)
Chile con Carne (no beans), made with homemade chili powder
Colorado Green Chili (no beans) made with pork shoulder and two pounds of fresh Anaheim chiles

I could go on.
 
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