Read any good books lately?

quietgirll

New member
I thought dark places was an amazing book, and by far the best of the 3! Both of those 2 are probably about to come right back up on my re-read list!
 

quietgirll

New member
Also see ken follet mentioned in here a couple of times...his stuff is great. Pillars of the earth is just amazing, but not something I'd ever think I would read...probably the BEST I've ever read tho. Love his new century series, and his other non spy works are good. I've never read any of his international spy books, those topics just dont appeal to me.
 
Last edited:

Goofballs

Member
Any other Vince Flynn fans? I really enjoy his books for a quick fictional/strategic CIA read. I don't know that you necessarily must read them in order, but I have.
 

Grumpy

New member
Haven't read consistently as an adult much. Although I have read the Harry Potter series a few times. Pothead.
I live in a house full of Potheads. After reading all the books, they bought all the DVDs. For a while when they'd ask if I wanted to watch TV with them, I'd have to say "As long as we don't have to watch Harry Potter again." Not that I didn't enjoy the books myself, I just didn't quite get the obsession. I guess I know now how my parents felt about The Hobbit and Lord of The Rings.

I decided to make a collection called 2013 on my Kindle, and I'm putting every book I finish into that collection to see how many books I read in a year. I have 8 in there so far, and I'm over halfway done with 2 others right now.

I mostly read old books I can get for free, many of them geared to children because I want to find books for my book-gobbling children. I have been reading a lot of Elizabeth Gaskel novels for myself lately. I really enjoy her books. She's like a cross between Dickens and Jane Austen. I also recently read Treasure Island. I can't believe no one told me to read it as a child. It was wonderful. Swiss Family Robinson was another good one that I wish I had read earlier. It's nothing like the Disney movie, which I also love, but it's still fantastic.

Right now I'm reading The Omnivore's Dilemma. It has a lot of technical information in it, but it's still very good and very readable.

Grumpy, I can't imagine holding 5 Dickens' novels. I wouldn't want to read that book because it would be too big and clumsy. You should get a Kindle. You could get all of Dickens' and Twains' works on it, and it would be really lightweight. I love David Copperfield.
We gave my 13yo son a Kindle Fire for his birthday, and I loaded Robinson Crusoe and The Swiss Family Robinson on it before we gave it to him, because I felt the same way you did when I read them as an adult. To be fair though, my parents probably did encourage me to read them when I was younger, but like most kids I was caught up in what all the other kids were reading. I had to remind my son several times that I really wanted him to read them (between bouts of 'Angry Birds') but he did like them, once he get a handle on what he called 'the old-timey language'. "Uh...yeah. That would be 'English', son."

I'll probably break down and buy a Kindle for myself, eventually. They are convenient gadgets. I downloaded a reference manual for my new camera on Daniel's, in case I need it when we go on vacation. But I'm old-school; there's just something about turning pages and the permanence of books that I can't let go. I like keeping the publishers of physical books in business, too. I'm afraid that if we don't, one day our reliance on electronic media will cause a disaster akin to the burning of the Library of Alexandria.

I like your username, btw. Another of my favorite classics (though I had to wonder if Swift wasn't dropping acid when he wrote it).
 

simbasmom

Member
I love of Kinsella's books, I think I've read all of hers. I just finished Jennifer Weiner's new book The Next Best Thing. I also like Emily Giffin's books although the last one was a little disappointing in how short it was. Lauren Weisberger, Meg Cabot, Marian Keyes & really any chic lit lol I don't get a lot of time to read anymore, but when I do I want it to be fun!
Oh, thanks so much for this. When I read about what books some people read, I get so embarrassed that I don't read "intelligent" books. And it doesn't help that my mother calls what I read "junk" books. Because I so often forget the titles of what I read, I decided to join "goodreads" and keep track. I took the 2013 challenge, hoping for 65 books. Right now I'm reading Susan Mallery, "The Only Way Out", but I did love the Sophie Kinsella. I downloaded a free one, "Mr Right and Other Mongrels" that's supposed to be in the same style as Sophie Kinsella. We'll see!
 

HMaries

New member
Oh, thanks so much for this. When I read about what books some people read, I get so embarrassed that I don't read "intelligent" books. And it doesn't help that my mother calls what I read "junk" books. Because I so often forget the titles of what I read, I decided to join "goodreads" and keep track. I took the 2013 challenge, hoping for 65 books. Right now I'm reading Susan Mallery, "The Only Way Out", but I did love the Sophie Kinsella. I downloaded a free one, "Mr Right and Other Mongrels" that's supposed to be in the same style as Sophie Kinsella. We'll see!
I'll have to check it out, thanks. Yeah with the 2 kids my reading times is usually during carpool and those 20min before I pass out in bed each night lol usually with the book falling to wake me up :D I try not to read too much during the days since I can get so caught up in the book that I neglect what I'm supposed to be doing lol
 

mmshell103

New member
Oh, thanks so much for this. When I read about what books some people read, I get so embarrassed that I don't read "intelligent" books. And it doesn't help that my mother calls what I read "junk" books. Because I so often forget the titles of what I read, I decided to join "goodreads" and keep track. I took the 2013 challenge, hoping for 65 books. Right now I'm reading Susan Mallery, "The Only Way Out", but I did love the Sophie Kinsella. I downloaded a free one, "Mr Right and Other Mongrels" that's supposed to be in the same style as Sophie Kinsella. We'll see!
Have you read anything by Cecelia Ahern? She wrote P.S. I love you - I didn't like the movie much but loved the book!
 

Broncho

New member
I might get more ebooks if they were cheaper. It doesn't make any sense to me that an ebook, which doesn't have to be printed, shipped or stored, is the same cost as a printed book. If they were consistently about half the price of a real book I might be more interested. I do have several ebooks but they are ones I got for free such as several of the Tarzan books and some of the Barsoom books or ones that were on sale that I couldn't even buy used paperbacks for that price (most of the James Bond novels). As it is, I don't have much time to read anything right now but I'm trying to work through the complete Sherlock Holmes. One of these days I'll get all of them, as well as the physical books I've got, read, hopefully before I lose them.
 

Grumpy

New member
Oh, thanks so much for this. When I read about what books some people read, I get so embarrassed that I don't read "intelligent" books. And it doesn't help that my mother calls what I read "junk" books.
I have a complete 11-volume set of The History of Civilization by Will Durant. It was a gift from my Dad years ago, and I appreciate it because 1) before the days of Amazon, it was hard to find, and 2) in this condition, it still is. I've never read it. I tried, several times, but it's quite possibly the driest, most boring thing I've ever laid my hands on. There's probably someone out there (who's smarter than me) who enjoyed reading it, and I'm okay with that. At least I gave it a shot. But there's nothing more dreary than forcing yourself to read something that you're just not interested in.

Here's the flip-side to that: Let Us Now Praise Famous Men is a book about southern sharecroppers' lives in the early 1900s. I was born and raised in Georgia, and I love history, so the subject interests me. Agee won a Pulitzer for it, and it was on my Dad's bookshelf, so I decided to read it. It wasn't easy. The man wrote sentences that took up whole pages. His mind opens up like a floodgate, and you either swim or sink. But because I found it interesting, I dog-paddled through it, even though it took a while, and it ended up being one of my favorite books. My Dad never got it back, which always makes him happy.

The point of this thread was to encourage people to read something, because with all of life's gadgetry and demands on our time, it's good to remind ourselves that reading is still a worthwhile pursuit. Too many people don't read at all because they feel like they have to read what other people read, and its sad that they deprive themselves for such a silly reason. There's something out there for everyone. I like to challenge myself occasionally, but you don't have to, and no one here will think you 'less intelligent' if you don't. Read what you like, no matter what your mother thinks, no matter what anyone thinks. Just read.

BTW, I'll do well to read 20 books or so this year. If you read 65 (or even 52), I'll send you a box of Godiva chocolates. (Honestly. That's not sarcasm; I mean it.) :RpS_smile:
 

Grumpy

New member
I knew I'd get in trouble for that. :RpS_biggrin:

Fifty-two. But eleven of them have to be The History of Civilization, just so I can say that I know someone who read it.
 

simbasmom

Member
BTW, I'll do well to read 20 books or so this year. If you read 65 (or even 52), I'll send you a box of Godiva chocolates. (Honestly. That's not sarcasm; I mean it.) :RpS_smile:
Watch out! I'm a chocoholic-LOVE any chocolate. Put that together with reading, and I have a challenge!
 

quietgirll

New member
Lol so Ive actually set myself a goal on the 2013 challenge on goodreads....100 books! :) and I'll sporadically eat my chocolate as I read!
 

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
I just finished Steven King's 11/22/63, I think it's one of his best efforts.
I read that last year - it's the only Steven King book I've read. I was totally wrapped up in it for almost the whole thing, but I think the conclusion was pretty weak. Almost as if he realized he couldn't figure out how to end it, so let's just have a character pop up out of nowhere and explain everything, wrapping it up with a neat little bow. But outside of that, it was an absolute page turner!
 

Grumpy

New member
It did seem a bit contrived. I thought that he had the makings of a good ending in the works, then realized that it wouldn't be quite 'King-ish' to have anything resembling a 'happily ever after' ending.
 
Top