Recipes?

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
I have a friend who did a chuck roast (read: pot roast cut) sous vide, and he swore it was better than any prime rib he's ever had.
 

bnoble

he's right
I'd wonder about whether it is possible to break down the connective tissue and still not be (far) beyond medium...but I'm intrigued.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I have a friend who did a chuck roast (read: pot roast cut) sous vide, and he swore it was better than any prime rib he's ever had.
I’ve done a chuck roast and it was very prime rib-esque but not as good. Think 85% of the way there but seeing as chuck roast is a 1/5th the cost...


I'd wonder about whether it is possible to break down the connective tissue and still not be (far) beyond medium...but I'm intrigued.

I did mine medium-rare. It was very tender and I suspect it was because of the long cooking time. I’d have to find the recipe but I want to say it was a 60 hour bath.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
I'd wonder about whether it is possible to break down the connective tissue and still not be (far) beyond medium...but I'm intrigued.

I asked my friend, a scratch cook who never met a food he couldn't cook. He grows most of his own food, and even keeps bees. He writes:

You can cook it to 136°. This way it stays at med-rare. But you keep it at that temp for 18-24 hours. It's the time at that temp that will break down the tissue. If I didn't know because I cooked it, I would have been convinced I was eating top quality prime rib, not cheap chuck roast. Same perfect pink, med-rare temp. Same bite and mouthfeel. Only thing different was the shape.
 

Anne

Well-known member
A medium rare chuck roast blows my mind!

I used the sous vide for our Christmas roast. It was the most tender beef I've ever had, and a real medium rare (not chuck though I will have to give that a try).

I also did hollandaise sauce in the sous vide. It turned out way better than my double-boiler method attempt last month. And much easier. The sauce stayed together the next day too.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I have now made this beef stew recipe twice and both times it was a huge hit. Even my 10 year old ate all of the chard and using gnocchi instead of potatoes is genius.

FYI, there is some foul language in the recipe, but that is part of its charm.

 

bnoble

he's right
I've been on a serious comfort food kick lately.

I made this a bit ago when we all needed some comfort. Very good, and much better the next day.

Making the base today for chicken noodle soup on Monday.

Then there is this standby (I use either turkey cutlets or chicken breast instead of ground turkey. It is mild to the point of being bland as written, so I usually doctor it later with some hot sauce.)
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
I've been on a serious comfort food kick lately.

The stew sounds delicious. I might have to try that one. Bet it's good on buttered egg noodles.

I've taken to making soups and stews and portioning them into Ziploc bags for the freezer so I'm never more than 5 microwave minutes away from a home-cooked meal.

The turkey chili would be good if you could find ground dark meat. Dark meat is more fatty and ideal for long, slow braises. Ground turkey is so lean you have to add butter to it to give it any flavor at all. I avoid it at all costs. I'm lucky to have a great poultry farm nearby, so I can order exactly what I want.
 

Anne

Well-known member
It's funny you mention the NYT stew. I saw that recipe the same week I had gotten the ingredients for Strangeite's stew recipe. I did a hybrid and it turned out great! The gnocchi in stew idea from Strangeite's recipe was perfect.
 

ThemeParkCommando

Active member
I found a great recipe for hot and sour soup. I've tweaked it a bit and now love it more than my favorite chinese restaurant's version. The base recipe is from Amy in the Kitchen's website:
ingredients


  • 6 cups beef broth (or chicken broth) - I use chicken broth
  • ½ cup mushrooms (sliced ) - I use an umami blend that include Sliced shitake, oyster and baby bella mushrooms.
  • ¼ cup lite sodium soy sauce
  • ¼ cup rice wine vinegar - adding 1 extra tbsp kicks it up a bit.
  • 1 tablespoon sriracha sauce - knocked this to 1/2 tbsp, I like less spicy.
  • 1 teaspoon ground white pepper - MUST be white pepper, black doesn't work.
  • 3 tablespoons corn starch
  • 3 tablespoons cold water
  • 2 eggs (well beaten)
  • 6 oz. firm tofu (sliced into strips) - I omit tofu
  • 2 green onions (sliced)

the trick is to simmer the broth, soy sauce, vinegar, sririacha and pepper with the mushrooms for at least 15 to 20 minutes. You can smell when the mushrooms hit their peak. It's amazing, what letting the mushrooms simmer does for the soup. After they hit that umami step, I strain out the mushrooms. I don't like their texture. You mix the corn starch in the cold water to make a slurry, then add it in to the simmering soup to thicken. Don't add the eggs until the end. Turn off the heat, the drip the eggs into while slowly stirring. When I'm done, my soup only has eggs and green onions in it. Sometimes bits of pork. It is SO good.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I know how to make fried meat. And I know how to make very good fried meat.

However, one thing that has always bothered me is that really young kids would prefer mass produced chicken nuggets versus homemade fried chicken. Of course the toddlers are wrong, their taste buds are faulty, but it has always bothered me that they would prefer the factory stuff. Why?

It ain't just a matter of salt. It ain't just a good breading and batter. It is size. Or at least size makes a difference. The texture is strangely important and counterintutive to everything I know.

My oldest kid is 23 and my youngest is 10, so I have some experience trying various techniques that would appeal to a wide range of kids coming to my house to dine. I don't know why I decided (actually yesterday) that I wanted to try and recreate toddler approved chicken nuggets for a Monday night dinner but I did.

I do think I have figured out the code, even if I haven't perfected it yet.

This recipe was my foundation.

Grinding the chicken and adding MSG into the grind, were the biggest revelations. The use of corn starch and making use of lots of rests, is common, but nothing I have seen in other nugget recipes.

It freakin' works.

Tips I learned: I need to measure each nugget smaller. Not just in mass but in height. It really does need to be at maximum 1/2" thickness and 1/4" minimum. Grinding the meat in the food processor is quick and easy. Setting it up next to the sink to re-wet your hands is important. If your nuggets are absorbing the initial dunk in the flour mixture, re-dunk them in the flour. Pink shouldn't be showing through. I learned that from PBS this season.

IMG_6686.jpgIMG_6687.jpg
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I didn't try the sauce aspect of that recipe becuase it looked like trash and I don't like McDs Sweet and Sour sauce.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I have been craving a good meatball sandwich lately and the part of my brain that was itching to try to recreate McNuggets is itching again.
 
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BSS

Active member
I love a good meatball sandwich with just a little bit of kick. I haven't made meatballs in a while. Maybe I'll do that this weekend.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
Here's one that's a bit different, Chicken Parmesan Meatballs. They're totally delicious, and nicely mimic all the good things about Chicken Parm and eschews the greasy fried good, the gloppy cheese, and the dry sauce. This one hits it out of the park. You can eat them with some crusty bread, on top of pasta, or in SANDWICHES!

I've made a .PDF because the recipe is behind Cook's Contry's paywall.

0jo0eTOl.jpg
 

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smwisc

Active member
Here's one that's a bit different, Chicken Parmesan Meatballs. They're totally delicious, and nicely mimic all the good things about Chicken Parm and eschews the greasy fried good, the gloppy cheese, and the dry sauce. This one hits it out of the park. You can eat them with some crusty bread, on top of pasta, or in SANDWICHES!

I've made a .PDF because the recipe is behind Cook's Contry's paywall.

0jo0eTOl.jpg
Thanks for the pdf - that looks delicious! It looks like it could freeze well too.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
Thanks for the pdf - that looks delicious! It looks like it could freeze well too.
Mine didn't make it that far, but others who've made it report that they freeze beautifully. I'd just keep the breadcrumbs separate, and add at the end, after reheating, so they maintain their crunch.

FYI, I followed the recipe exactly, and got 20 meatballs. A good portion is four, so this is a good recipe for five people.
 

smwisc

Active member
Mine didn't make it that far, but others who've made it report that they freeze beautifully. I'd just keep the breadcrumbs separate, and add at the end, after reheating, so they maintain their crunch.

FYI, I followed the recipe exactly, and got 20 meatballs. A good portion is four, so this is a good recipe for five people.
That's perfect, as we are a family of five! (including 3 children whose food consumption is wildly unpredictable, but still)
 
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