Seen any good movies? Or bad ones?

RetroCOTfan

Active member
Watch Citizen Kane. Skip Mank. But seriously, it’s a gorgeous looking movie, but it plays like the pet project it is (Fincher’s late father wrote the screenplay), and apart from a few tally scenes, it never gets off the ground. I suppose there was a good story in there somewhere, but it didn’t grab me. And I’m a huge Welles and Kane fan. Those unfamiliar with the behind-the-scenes story will be totally lost.
It felt like it was made solely for the purpose of garnering Oscar nominations. Because if there's anything Hollywood/the Academy loves, it's movies about making movies in old Hollywood.
 

Alcachofa

Active member
OK, I'll put Nomadland on my list next instead. ;)

Oh, and I ended up watching Citizen Kane again anyway. Not sure how I found 2 hours, but somehow I did.
 

Not That Josh

Well-known member
Those unfamiliar with the behind-the-scenes story will be totally lost.

I was wondering about that. I haven't watched Mank yet, but I have seen some interviews and it seemed like people need to know the back story. I think I know most of it, but there may be aspects I don't know.

That's a small target audience for a film.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
I was wondering about that. I haven't watched Mank yet, but I have seen some interviews and it seemed like people need to know the back story. I think I know most of it, but there may be aspects I don't know.

That's a small target audience for a film.

I consider myself knowledgeable about this much more than the average moviegoer; I’ve read a couple Welles biographies, film histories, etc., so I knew who most of the people were. But the screenplay does an awful job of introducing the players to those who might not know much going in. That’s one of the huge problems I had with it. I really wanted to like this. But man, that cinematography was off the charts beautiful.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
Emerald Fennell (Call the Midwife, Killing Eve, Fleabag, The Crown) makes her pitch-perfect directorial and film screenwriting and producing debut with Promising Young Woman, a black comedy/thriller rape revenge fantasy that’s at turns enormously entertaining and horrific. Coming at just the right time, this story of an ex-medical student avenging the rape of her best friend portrays how that original crime and it’s unfair ramifications affect the victims and, much less sympathetically, the perpetrators. Carey Mulligan continues to choose challenging and varied projects that showcase her formidable talents (I’m a huge fan of her performance in 2010’s Never Let Me Go), and deservedly has an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress for this. More than just a psycho-killer drama like the dreadful Fatal Attraction, the film opens the discussion of the injustices of the woman’s word vs. the Good Ol’ Boys protective environment. You can rent this on many streaming platforms for $5.99. Do it.
 

Not That Josh

Well-known member
Not sure what I can say about Stowaway as there are many ways I could spoil it. I will just say the ethical dilemmas and difficult decisions made me think "what would I do" or "could I do that" more than once.
 

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
First movie in a theater since March 2020: A Quiet Place Part II. It was really TENSE. The movie, not the theater (we're all fully vaccinated). I love how it started and how it picked up the threads of the story from the first movie, building upon the emotional foundation laid in the original.
 

Not That Josh

Well-known member
For no logical reason, I thought about the movie Idiocracy today. The movie may end up being prophetic of a stupid future, but not in the way the movie predicts. Instead of stupidity taking over because everyone will be born stupid, now it seems more likely to happen through people choosing to be stupid.

I guess that shows how busy I was with really important activities today. :)
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
First movie in a theater since March 2020: A Quiet Place Part II. It was really TENSE. The movie, not the theater (we're all fully vaccinated). I love how it started and how it picked up the threads of the story from the first movie, building upon the emotional foundation laid in the original.
We did too! We weren't as enamored of it as you were. I thought there wasn't much plot there (hide, venture out, get out of a pickle; hide, venture out, get out of a pickle), and then it ended much too abruptly. It's admirable how the filmmakers managed to amp up the tension (in more of the same ways as the first movie) without having to resort to explicit violence or gore, but I think it was a mistake to take the mystery out of the previously (mostly) unseen predators. It was fun to be at the movies again (we remained masked, not everyone did), and I look forward to easing back into the scene. I hadn't been to a movie theatre since 3/9/20's Portrait of a Lady on Fire.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
For no logical reason, I thought about the movie Idiocracy today. The movie may end up being prophetic of a stupid future, but not in the way the movie predicts.

Idiocracy is one of the movies that I found enjoyable but ultimately forgettable when it came out. However, it wormed its way into my head and is now one I think about frequently.
 

Not That Josh

Well-known member
I watched Bo Burnham: Inside. It's his new special he made solo over many months during the pandemic. It's definitely funny, but there is so much more going on, including the difficulty of spending that much time alone and what that does to you.

I thought it was impressive and I don't know how he was able to do it.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
Disney+ has a new 10 episode series called "Behind the Attraction" premiering July 16.

Based on the description for each episode, it really looks something my family will enjoy.

 

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
Yes, definitely excited for that. Also:
In The Heights, the Lin-Manuel Miranda musical, hits HBO Max this Friday, June 11th
Pixar's Luca is out next Friday, June 18th on Disney+
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
I can’t wait to start The Underground Railroad, on Amazon Prime. The novel, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction a few years back, was extraordinary. The limited series was directed by Barry (Moonlight, If Beale Street Could Talk) Jenkins, so this promises to be thrilling.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
Having somehow managed to be completely ignorant of the Broadway musical that this big screen adaptation of In the Heights is based on, I went in fearful of this film being my first exposure to it. Lin-Manuel Miranda’s celebrated breakthrough musical, before he went on to create That Other One, is adapted by director Jon M. Chu, of Crazy Rich Asians fame, and indeed, this film shares the colorful palette and annoying herky-jerky editing rhythms of Chu’s previous film, amped up here because this is a musical, after all. In spite of pandering to the music video age, the film and (let’s give credit where credit is due) the material overcomes the currently fashionable tendency for reaction shots and body part close-ups to tell its universal story of neighborhood community identity with identifiable characters and assimilation tropes; part of tbe pleasure of this story is in figuring out how it could apply to just about any ethnic “ghetto.” It’s a Fiddler on the Roof, updated. The songs are appropriately infectious and the lyrics, of course, deft. Anthony Ramos stands out as the lead here, but the entire cast brings its A-game.

It’s nice to be back at the movies, by the way, and the seat-rattling audio and crisp visuals of Dolby Atmos is an important reminder of why it’s imperative to fight for the survival of big movie exhibition.
 
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