Seen any good movies? Or bad ones?

U

User56767

Guest
Tomorrow War is at least as bad as the critics said, probably worse. Dopey fun though, especially considering Bezos paid $200 million for streaming rights. It could have been better in about a hundred different ways. There is the potential for a good movie there but they fired on no cylinders.
 

Art Vandelay

that's a shame
Tarantino has been making the rounds, I saw him on Jimmy Kimmel then heard him on the WTF podcast. He wrote a book, it's the novel of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. I'm going to rewatch it then read the book, which goes deep into the character's background stories.
 

George

The ratio of people to cake is too big.
Tarantino has been making the rounds, I saw him on Jimmy Kimmel then heard him on the WTF podcast. He wrote a book, it's the novel of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. I'm going to rewatch it then read the book, which goes deep into the character's background stories.
The novel’s gotten some good reviews. Tarantino’s nothing if not a good writer. I added it to my Kindle list at the library.
 

RetroCOTfan

Well-known member
He was on CBS Sunday Morning yesterday, too. Not only did he discuss the book, but also included a brief discussion of his upcoming 10th—and final—movie, which he hasn’t started writing yet. He said he envisions Once Upon a Time as his big “epic” finale, and that his last movie will be more of an “epilogue,” so a smaller-scale story.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
I watched The Tomorrow War last night.

It was so unbelievably bad that my brain is still hurting this morning. When Starship Troopers came out, I hated the movie with a passion but that was because I didn't get it. The director made an anti-fascist movie by showcasing the absurdity of the jingoistic society of the future. Perhaps that is the case with The Tomorrow War too and that I just don't get it. I hope that is the case because otherwise... oh boy, this was bad.
 
U

User56767

Guest
We've enjoyed the first two installments of the Fear Street trilogy on Netflix. They're billed as horror but they're not really very scary. A little bit of gore but they're really going for a mainstream audience. I love that each movie comes out a week apart.

The kid is going to an all night She-Ra viewing party so we're going to watch Minari tonight. Only a few more weeks until they're off to college and we're empty nesters... 😭
 

George

The ratio of people to cake is too big.
I’ve fastidiously avoided Disney’s “Origin Story” films on a moral basis, so when I heard of Cruella, their latest release, I naturally rolled my eyes and pursed my lips in disgust, weeping for the future of Le cinéma. And, indeed, I figured I wouldn’t even admit to having seeing this, let alone posting about it in my movie thread here. But positive reviews, and recommendations from some of the few people I trust to give such recommendations, got me away from DVRed Judge Judy shows and out to “the show” to see this on the big screen, and I’m happy to report that I had a rip-roaring good time at this. Far from being simply an “origin story” (though there are hints along the way for those who must, as well as a board-to-the-head mid-credits epilogue), this is mostly a sweet Devil Wears Prada knock-off, urged along excitedly by a crackerjack screenplay, some inventive set design, and, especially, performances by Emma Stone and Emma Thompson, who take their paydays absolutely seriously. Teetering dangerously close to scenery-chewing, they instead reign it in justenough to keep things from going ridiculously off the rails. The fun use of popular songs and some most certainly computer-generated whiz-bang camera moves kept me interested, and reminded me that if, after 20 minutes, you still have my attention, that Something Special is happening. The ubiquitous CGI is kept to a merciful minimum. This is also streaming on Disney+ (for an extra charge? If so, not for long). Check it out.
 
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U

User56767

Guest
I had no idea what you were talking about until I got to Emma Stone. With you and Josh both highly recommending, I guess I’ll have to watch it too.

Minari, by the way, was excellent. Amazing performances. Much better than Nomadland in my opinion.
 

George

The ratio of people to cake is too big.
I had no idea what you were talking about until I got to Emma Stone. With you and Josh both highly recommending, I guess I’ll have to watch it too.

Minari, by the way, was excellent. Amazing performances. Much better than Nomadland in my opinion.
Sorry - I edited my post to include the film title. Duh!

Minari is next on my list. Can't wait. And I thought Nomadland was simply breathtaking; I know I've posted about it previously.
 

ThemeParkCommando

Active member
I watched The Tomorrow War last night. I didn't find it all that bad. But then, I don't look deeply into movies. As with any time travel movie, it had a number of paradoxes and interesting explanations on how time works, but those are always fun to debate.
The movie did exactly what a movie should for me. It kept me entertained, it made me laugh, it made me feel some angst and suspense. It was just another 'Alien' type movie. Good summer fluff.
 

George

The ratio of people to cake is too big.
The funniest sequence to come to the movies in too long a time starts as a brutal takedown of trendy dining and the FOMOs that make places like that possible, and then morphs into a heartbreaking treatise on ambition and dreams, passion versus profit. It’s indicative of the tone of Pig,a quiet drama about a truffle hunter forced to embark on a journey into his past when his prized truffle pig is stolen, and to its credit it sustains this tone for its entire running time without having to resort to mundane preaching. Nicolas Cage gives a subdued (!) performance here and creates a tortured portrait of someone who’s just a bit too smart for this earth. Part nature drama, part culinary thriller, the film makes you lean in so you don’t miss a single nuance, and goes off in directions that you don’t see coming. This is sure to find its place in the foodie movie pantheon. Just go.
 
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Abbyar

Active member
I watched The Tomorrow War last night.

It was so unbelievably bad that my brain is still hurting this morning. When Starship Troopers came out, I hated the movie with a passion but that was because I didn't get it. The director made an anti-fascist movie by showcasing the absurdity of the jingoistic society of the future. Perhaps that is the case with The Tomorrow War too and that I just don't get it. I hope that is the case because otherwise... oh boy, this was bad.
Thank goodness I'm not the only one. The whole thing was just....awful. The script writers should not be allowed to do anything, ever again.
 

josh

Administrator
Staff member
Not movie-related but I am excited for the next season of Ted Lasso. Really didn't think I'd like that one.

I'd join Tarantino on "Tenet." I think I need to see it again. And I've seen it four times. But it's so beautiful on my LG OLED that I don't even care that I can't make sense of it. And it actually does make a lot of sense on the second watch.

It's been a while since I've started and finished a movie. I usually make it about ten minutes in and switch it over to baseball. Which reminds me, I'm available for MLB 21 if you want to play me online sometime. (And lose.) (Unless I'm the Mariners, which I usually am.)
 

bnoble

he's right
My son played soccer as his primary sport (and was in the recruiting mix at some power 5 programs before he decided not to play big-time varsity sports) and they get a lot of the soccer stuff right too.

I think even the Lasso Special is possible within the rules, but I don't think it would have been that effective.
 

George

The ratio of people to cake is too big.
DVR alert!

I know many of you have TCM on your TV/cable/streaming packages. Do yourself a favor and watch and/or record Badlands early tomorrow morning.

Sissy Spacek (in her debut). Martin Sheen. And, probably most importantly, the feature debut from Terrence Malick (Days of Heaven. The Thin Red Line, The Tree of Life), one of the great filmmakers to come out of the fertile ‘70s American film scene. Along with Coppola, Scorsese, and Spielberg, he’s one of the iconoclasts. This poetic and fictionalized look at a pair of serial killers from the ‘50s from 1973 all but reinvented (or at the very least added to) the storytelling capabilities of auteur-driven storytelling. I can’t say enough aboot this one. You will be mesmerized and never forget this. You’re welcome.

Badlands on TCM
 

Art Vandelay

that's a shame
DVR alert!

I know many of you have TCM on your TV/cable/streaming packages. Do yourself a favor and watch and/or record Badlands early tomorrow morning.

Sissy Spacek (in her debut). Martin Sheen. And, probably most importantly, the feature debut from Terrence Malick (Days of Heaven. The Thin Red Line, The Tree of Life), one of the great filmmakers to come out of the fertile ‘70s American film scene. Along with Coppola, Scorsese, and Spielberg, he’s one of the iconoclasts. This poetic and fictionalized look at a pair of serial killers from the ‘50s from 1973 all but reinvented (or at the very least added to) the storytelling capabilities of auteur-driven storytelling. I can’t say enough aboot this one. You will be mesmerized and never forget this. You’re welcome.

Badlands on TCM

For years, I missed great movies on TCM. Then I stumbled upon @nextonTCM on Twitter. They post the upcoming movie one hour in advance of its start time. I'm accumulating more on the DVR than I have time to watch.

The last classic film I caught because of @nextonTCM was The Getaway. I'd heard Marc Maron talking about it when he interviewed Sally Struthers, then about a week later, it was on TCM. Late 60's into the mid 70's was my favorite era for movies.
 

George

The ratio of people to cake is too big.
For years, I missed great movies on TCM. Then I stumbled upon @nextonTCM on Twitter. They post the upcoming movie one hour in advance of its start time. I'm accumulating more on the DVR than I have time to watch.

The last classic film I caught because of @nextonTCM was The Getaway. I'd heard Marc Maron talking about it when he interviewed Sally Struthers, then about a week later, it was on TCM. Late 60's into the mid 70's was my favorite era for movies.
Make time for Badlands!
 
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