Seen any good movies? Or bad ones?

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
If you'd like a pretty thorough musicological analysis of "Satisfied" I really recommend this podcast:
Strong Songs - "Satisfied"

It's in-depth but also presented in a basic way so as to be accessible to people without any musical training or knowledge of theory. If you've ever wondered why that song is so powerful, this explains some of the musical reasons why.

For my money, the back-to-back pairing of "Helpless" and "Satisfied" is the best 1-2 punch in the entire show.

Finally had a chance to listen to this episode and I'm blown away with how much went into that song. I don't have any kind of music theory background beyond several years of piano lessons in elementary school and junior high, but you're right, he makes it very understandable. Thanks again for sharing the link!
 

DopeyRunr

the jeweled acrobats only perform amazing stunts f
We watched The Hate U Give last night. I read the book a couple of years ago. About halfway through my daughter asked if it was based on a true story (no, but it could have been) and toward the end she asks when the movie was made (because it almost seemed like we were watching recent TV news footage).

As you would expect, the book was much better and Starr's character arc much more nuanced in it, but Amandla Stenberg's performance in the film is amazing. I didn't recognize her but I just read that she is the actress who played Rue in The Hunger Games movie.
 

George

wishes he had a pink frolicing llama under his tag
Thinking about travel, and how much I miss it, I was reminded of this brilliant short film from Paris je T'aime, an anthology film released some years ago, a dozen or so short films by famous directors, about Paris. The contribution by Alexander Payne (The Descendants, Sideways, Nebraska, Election, Citizen Ruth, et.al.) was particularly touching, with a beautiful performance by Margo Martindale as a lonely woman discovering the joys of Paris during one day. It's only 6 minutes or so, but it's likely the best thing you'll see all day.

 

Art Vandelay

that's a shame
Hamilton. I am not a musical fan. I am not a hip hop fan. But I'm watching it (3/4 through it) from the perspective of "how much work went into the script, the music, the lyrics, the choreography, the costumes, the casting" and I'm pretty blown away. Taking it one step back, to Miranda reading a Hamilton biography and writing one rap, and it's an amazing story.

It makes me think that schools teach history the wrong way. So much is focused on names, dates, events. It should be focused on what drove the people to do what they did, and the personal interactions. Why was Hamilton an insecure overachiever? How did that affect his outlook on what he thought was good for the new nation? I said to my wife, "If history was taught like a soap opera, kids would like it."
 
D

Deleted member 519

Guest
Hamilton. I am not a musical fan. I am not a hip hop fan. But I'm watching it (3/4 through it) from the perspective of "how much work went into the script, the music, the lyrics, the choreography, the costumes, the casting" and I'm pretty blown away. Taking it one step back, to Miranda reading a Hamilton biography and writing one rap, and it's an amazing story.

It makes me think that schools teach history the wrong way.
Same. I fully expected to turn it off 30 minutes in, but I really enjoyed it. It’s a really amazing story and the telling is truly unique.
 

RetroCOTfan

Active member
It makes me think that schools teach history the wrong way. So much is focused on names, dates, events. It should be focused on what drove the people to do what they did, and the personal interactions. Why was Hamilton an insecure overachiever? How did that affect his outlook on what he thought was good for the new nation? I said to my wife, "If history was taught like a soap opera, kids would like it."

As a guy with a history degree, I 100% agree with you. I had several teachers throughout my academic career that got this. As one of them told us, "History is, above all, a STORY - the story of all of us. Study it that way, and it will actually mean something."
 

RetroCOTfan

Active member
Finally had a chance to listen to this episode and I'm blown away with how much went into that song. I don't have any kind of music theory background beyond several years of piano lessons in elementary school and junior high, but you're right, he makes it very understandable. Thanks again for sharing the link!

Glad you enjoyed it! The level of effort and detail that went into Hamilton is mind blowing and, on first listen, completely hidden from the audience. Like any great work, the longer you look at it, the more you see.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
As a guy with a history degree, I 100% agree with you. I had several teachers throughout my academic career that got this. As one of them told us, "History is, above all, a STORY - the story of all of us. Study it that way, and it will actually mean something."

I don't know if it is common elsewhere but when I was in high school, AP US History was combined with AP US Literature. The class had two teachers and was two hours long. The idea of the course was to allow what you are learning in history to shine a light on the literature, and likewise, allow the literature to provide context for the history. It was a good course.
 

RetroCOTfan

Active member
I don't know if it is common elsewhere but when I was in high school, AP US History was combined with AP US Literature. The class had two teachers and was two hours long. The idea of the course was to allow what you are learning in history to shine a light on the literature, and likewise, allow the literature to provide context for the history. It was a good course.
That sounds phenomenal. When I was in high school (25+ years ago(!)), my high school--for whatever reason--did not promote taking AP exams, so we didn't have AP courses. We had "honors" courses that dealt with more difficult/higher level work, but didn't teach specifically for AP. And while they were challenging, they were nothing like what you described. It wasn't until college that I got a "real" history education.
 

ThemeParkCommando

Active member
When I first read this, my initial thought was that maybe the AP block course was a newer trend, then I realized that next year will be my 25th class reunion and I then felt very very old.
yeah.... don't let it get you down. When I was in high school, it was 40 years ago. (class of '80!). There were only honors classes. You were not yet expected to go to a university upon graduation. You were expected to either go to university, apprentice for a trade ( shop classes were huge. Had their own building and did everything from woodworking, blacksmithing, mechanics to house building) or work your way up the corporate / military ladder.
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
My wife and I watched Palm Springs over the weekend. We both really enjoyed it but it is the kind of movie that I especially enjoy.

On whether it would be appropriate for the kids, particularly since in our household we are more concerned about how violence is portrayed in comparison to sex, is interesting and we had a good conversation about. The most "graphic" scenes are certainly not titillating and are important to the story, however, they are uncomfortable. And they are supposed to be.

I don't know. There is no doubt in my mind that they would enjoy the movie. My daughter in particular would find the concept and execution her jam, but those couple of scenes would definitely necessitate a conversation about healthy and unhealthy sexual relationships. A conversation that while healthy to have, one that nobody would be looking forward to.

So, I loved it. Totally think my kids would enjoy it, but not going to be in any rush to introduce it to them, primarily because of the uncomfortable conversation that would result, which is exactly why we try to destigmatize sex in the first place.
 

RetroCOTfan

Active member
yeah.... don't let it get you down. When I was in high school, it was 40 years ago. (class of '80!). There were only honors classes. You were not yet expected to go to a university upon graduation. You were expected to either go to university, apprentice for a trade ( shop classes were huge. Had their own building and did everything from woodworking, blacksmithing, mechanics to house building) or work your way up the corporate / military ladder.

Your Class of '80 experience sounds a lot like my Class of '95 experience. I grew up in an oil-refining town, and a third of all the boys graduating already had $20/hr jobs lined up at one of the various refineries thanks to their dad. We, too, had an entire building dedicated to trades - mechanics, HVAC, welding, etc.
 

bnoble

he's right
I don't know if it is common elsewhere but when I was in high school, AP US History was combined with AP US Literature. The class had two teachers and was two hours long.
Both of my kids took the "Humanities Block" their senior years; two consecutive hours, two teachers. It was not attached to any particular AP course, but it was taught much more like a college class than a typical high school course. Literature, Architecture, Philosophy, and Dance (I think---don't quote me on the exact set). Each instructor took two of the topics. It was easily a highlight of their high school experiences.

One of the Architecture activities was particularly great. The school was built in the 2000's (opening in 2008), so it is about as modern in design as it gets. The students studied the Panopticon, and then they toured the school, noting just how...similar...the designs are. Both kids came home on fire with what they'd learned that day.

The course was full of subversive activities like that. Yet another reason I love living here in the People's Republic of Ann Arbor.
 

Denise25

Member
Thinking about travel, and how much I miss it, I was reminded of this brilliant short film from Paris je T'aime, an anthology film released some years ago, a dozen or so short films by famous directors, about Paris. The contribution by Alexander Payne (The Descendants, Sideways, Nebraska, Election, Citizen Ruth, et.al.) was particularly touching, with a beautiful performance by Margo Martindale as a lonely woman discovering the joys of Paris during one day. It's only 6 minutes or so, but it's likely the best thing you'll see all day.


Thank you George, I enjoyed that. Being an occasional solo traveler of a similar age, I could definitely relate.
 

merbears

Member
Watched Howard the Duck .....coz he was in Guardians of the Galaxy. Still not sure what I saw lol. Pandemic makes people do weird things-that’s my excuse.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

magic1106

May be computer illiterate, but I figured out how
Watched Howard the Duck .....coz he was in Guardians of the Galaxy. Still not sure what I saw lol. Pandemic makes people do weird things-that’s my excuse.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Apparen
Watched Howard the Duck .....coz he was in Guardians of the Galaxy. Still not sure what I saw lol. Pandemic makes people do weird things-that’s my excuse.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

What was the excuse in the 80’s when they made that movie?
 

Strangeite

Well-known member
Just finished the first episode of Lovecraft Country on HBO.

So far it is doing an excellent job of illuminating the brutal racism of Jim Crow America juxtaposed against Lovecraftian nightmares. If you enjoy early 20th century pulp fiction, beautifully shot period pieces and cutting social commentary, check it out.

When Uncle George
asks "What happens when a vampire bites someone?" and then looks at the deputy and says "You need to shoot him,"
I laughed out loud.
 

josh

Administrator
Staff member
I like the look of Lovecraft but I tend to wait until about 2/3 of a way into a season to start because I am bad at waiting for new episodes.

Anyone who hasn't watched "Watchmen" has to. "The Outsider" I liked also. "McMillions" I think it was called was interesting but the fact that everyone was named Jerry was confusing and it probably could have been an episode shorter. All that is HBO. Perry Mason might be my next show.

Watched Jurassic Park on Netflix the other day, which may hold up better than just about anything.

I'm watching "The Umbrella Academy" on Netflix while I ride my exercise bicycle. It is certainly an interesting world that they've created though I'm not sure it entirely delivers. About half way through season two. Only pay about 25% attention.

Love Ozark.

Dark is still the best show on Netflix.

I am still big on Mr. Robot, which has come to its conclusion. The first three seasons are on Amazon Prime. You may need to be slightly tech-y to get into it, which may be why it didn't garner a larger audience.

For adults who like strange movies I would recommend "Sorry To Bother You." But this is very much not for everybody. I can't say much about it without ruining it. But it it not what you're expecting even as you watch it. That's on Hulu.

I didn't enjoy "The Art of Self Defense" as much as I thought I would but I might have been in a bad mood. I thought it tried to be a little too clever, like a Sorkin script where nobody actually talks like that. Good reviews. Also on Hulu.
 
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